cafo

Most people like meat and want to eat it, and do so the minute they get enough money to buy it. I think a more realistic question is this: Can factory farming be done better?
Dining on atypical cuts may seem to be solely the domain of foodies, snobs who use food as cultural capital. I've met people like that and, yes, they're assholes.
CAFOs are a perverse inversion of our idea of family farms with pigs rolling in the mud, cows grazing in pastures, roosters crowing from fence posts, and farmers interacting with the animals.
Pig producers who sell meat to Russia must wean their animals off antibiotics at least two weeks prior to slaughter. Japan requires a four-week flush-out period. This begs the question, what do the Russians and Japanese know about meat that we don't?
Will I change the world? No chance. But this meatlover's voice is one more in a growing chorus and perhaps together we can change farming in the US.
There are books on both sides of the issue, but we would like to see point and counterpoint side by side. We would also like to debunk some myths.
There are nearly 20 times as many hens here in Iowa as there are people, producing a shade over 14 billion eggs a year. As one might expect, their living conditions are less than ideal.
Feeding cattle chicken litter is everyday practice in feedlots. Surprisingly, this unhealthy and inhumane practice is legal and poorly monitored, creating unacceptable risks to human and animal health.
Robbie Kenner didn't mean to make a horror film when he started working on Food, Inc.. But you can't shine a light on our food chain without exposing some ugly truths.
Nestle: "Our report fully documented how confined animal feeding operations promote transmission of nasty -- and often antibiotic resistant -- microbial diseases."
Our ever-evolving culture gave me a new verb, a new phrase, and a new acronym last week.