Caitlin Flanagan

“Guys are married for a million years, they want to flirt for two seconds," he said, excusing Matthews' creepy comments.
There’s a reckoning happening among South Asians who may have lost an idol, but it was never about pitting white women against brown men.
My teenage son has begun looking at colleges. Recently, while we were looking at admissions brochures over breakfast, he asked me how I'd feel if he joined a fraternity.
Details about these falls and the injuries that result are so pervasive in Flanagan's report that Gawker compiled them all
In her cover story for the March issue of The Atlantic, Caitlin Flanagan takes on one of the most heavily fortressed bastions of the American male -- the college fraternity -- and most assuredly scores some direct hits.
America is obsessed with sex. And not in a good way.
Caitlin Flanagan goes there -- the third rail of women talking about other women -- the kind of stuff we lower our voices to share -- she goes after Joan Didion's portrayal of herself as a mother. With all due respect.
One day I would like to pick up the Atlantic and see a well-reported article about American women that's without the "What the hell are they up to now?" brand of alarm.
Women have been having casual sex for a long time. But what kind of casual sex was Karen Owen having? She tells us in disturbing detail -- disturbing for reasons she clearly doesn't understand.
If what we are seeing in Karen Owen is the realization of female sexual power, then we must at least admit that the first