Camp David

The "Late Show" host also came up with a very special award, just for Trump.
President Donald Trump faced backlash after he announced on Twitter that he canceled talks with the Taliban just days before the anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.
The now-canceled negotiations were set to take place at Camp David just days before the anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the president revealed.
He "found out the Taliban kill people" just before the anniversary of 9/11, one wag scoffed.
President Donald Trump said he canceled the Camp David meeting after the Taliban claimed responsibility for a deadly bomb attack in Kabul earlier this week.
Trump took a helicopter Saturday from the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland to his property in Virginia.
Commentary: How Trump handles Obamacare will set his presidency's course By Stuart H. Shapiro and LeRoy Goldman The most
Boutros Boutros-Ghali was not one for political correctness. Despite his urbane diplomatic ways he found it difficult to dissemble least of all when confronted with what one might call unwarranted arrogance or even common stupidity.
The deadlock in the Israeli-Palestinian peace process appears to be illogical and unsettling as a majority of Israelis and Palestinians realize that coexistence, whether under conditions of enmity or friendship, is a fact that neither side can change short of a catastrophe.
How high must an American president get to escape the sweltering heat of the Washington summer? About 1,700 feet. That's how high Camp David, the official presidential retreat, sits in the relatively cool Catoctin Mountains, 62 miles from the White House.
From three billion miles away, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is sending us breathtaking photographs of the dwarf planet Pluto.
Given the sorry state of affairs in the Middle East, it's easy to conclude there's no end in sight to the ongoing chaos, violence and upheaval. Yet it is also a land of miracles. How else to explain recent revelations about secret meetings between Saudi Arabia and Israel to address a common foe, Iran.
Contrary to common wisdom, the turmoil sweeping the Middle East, the convergence of multiple conflicts, and future uncertainties have created new compelling circumstances that support the resumption of the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations.
U.S. policymakers need keen understanding of the history and religious tensions between Sunnis (primarily in Saudi Arabia) and Shiites (so dominant in Iran) if they want to formulate an objective policy of any positive consequence for the region and beyond.
Throughout his presidency, Barack Obama has demonstrated tact and sensitivity in some areas, most notably when it comes to dealing with the U.S. Congress -- both Republicans and Democrats in his own party. Why should things be any different when it comes to foreign leaders?
Courting Arab leaders precisely as they undermine U.S. objectives gets it almost exactly backward. America's failures, under both Barack Obama and George W. Bush, stem from its unwillingness to break with allies taking actions that will result in disaster.
By all indications, Americans gave only passing notice to Saudi Arabian King Salman's abrupt and unexpected shuffling of major Cabinet posts -- including the fact the announcement came down at 4 a.m. Riyadh time.
A significantly different tone will characterize the upcoming meetings between President Barack Obama and the heads of state of the Gulf Cooperation Council (or GCC, which is comprised of the member states Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, the U.A.E., and Oman) to be held at the White House and Camp David May 13th-14th.
When the assorted Middle Eastern Sheiks, Kings, and Crown-Princes troop to Camp David this week for a meeting with President Obama to discuss America's rapidly warming relationship with Iran, they would do well to recall one of geopolitics eternal truisms.
Keen Middle East observers assert the Obama Administration is just playing for time with the Saudis and their GCC allies