cancer awareness

And many still don't know what to do. Because no matter how much we try to shield our friends, the truth always breaks through
Last year a member of my family was diagnosed with cancer. Fortunately this person received treatment and is now doing well
There is room for profit in the pharmaceutical industry. However, the amount of that profit should not cause suffering to patients, who are the pharmaceutical industry's consumer. As a country we must jointly stand together and insist on regulating the costs of these medications.
When the space program first started, the astronauts had no control over their capsules. This helpless feeling of being on a wild ride is precisely how I felt nearly eight years ago when I was told I had stage three breast cancer.
Let's be clear: there is nothing safe about e-cigarettes. They deliver nicotine, a highly addictive drug that carries many documented risks.
Some have criticized his "moonshot" to cure cancer as over-simplified.
Having been a smoker for 15 years, I realize that now is the time for me to stop acting and to take action -- to follow my own message and do my best to avoid becoming another lung cancer statistic.
Just your friendly preserved-meats apologist here.
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and tonight I'm joined by Fran Drescher, a leading voice in cancer advocacy. The Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated star of the hit '90s sit-com The Nanny is also the founder and president of the "Cancer Schmancer" Movement, which promotes early detection, prevention, and policy change.
The Ohio State University (O.S.U.) Men's Swimming Team will soon have a Big Challenge Swim (Race4cure) meet vs. Ohio's Kenyon College on October 30, representing two of the nation's best college swim programs.
I read something recently that made me catch my breath. It said that 90% of cancers are preventable. Crazy, right? It's Hispanic Heritage Month and I am part of a team of people at MomsRising.org that works at bringing awareness to health topics.
Staying on top of what is happening in leading scientific research is a lifeline for all pancreatic cancer patients and families. We have the most lethal cancer, and yet only 2 percent of the federal funding is directed to pancreatic cancer research!
At the Cancer Prevention Summit on May 20th, 2015, experts in public health will challenge us all to consider what we could be doing better to prevent cancer. Most importantly, we need to commit to a collaborative effort, involving every segment of our society.
Today The Joy Bus is an all-volunteer organization that delivers healthy, homemade meals to cancer patients and their families each week. As much as possible, we use fresh, organic, locally-sourced ingredients and we prepare meals to order to meet the dietary needs of each person.
I started the morning of my husband's cancer treatment reading about race issues. I read about the women who hate feminists, and the men who hate women. I watched videos about church-goers picketing gay marriage and young people writing off church because it's too political.
Future innovations will certainly help us reach beyond the potential for prevention that we know today, but we don't need to wait to have a major impact on rates of cancer. Cutting risk in half is a great place to start.
"An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure," is as true today as it was when we heard our grandparents say it.
What I can remember about my mother's death from breast cancer certainly does not reflect Dr. Smith's romantic view of dying.