cancer cure

he hope for those (like my own brother) who have what today are deemed as incurable cancers, is that they can be sustained long enough on therapies that slow down or halt cancer progression, giving the opportunity for one of the exciting new therapeutic approaches to become a reality and win the battle and ultimately the War on Cancers.
Scientists have seen small-scale successes with targeted therapeutics, and that could mean something big in the long run.
The inspiration to write and share insights with others can be manifested in many different ways. For us, like for many others we assume, such inspiration often comes from our own experiences and the physical or virtual interactions we have with fellow human beings.
More than 1.6 million Americans will receive a cancer diagnosis this year and approximately 595,690 people will die from this devastating disease -- that's 1,632 moms and dads, sons and daughters, grandparents, siblings and friends every day.
We truly believe that you never know which dollar is going to make the difference and lead to the next big discovery to help kids with cancer, and that every single dollar adds up toward making those dreams of a cure a reality.
The early bird gets the worm. Slow and steady wins the race. For those of us who are parents, these may be familiar sayings that we tell our children to either get them moving, or instead have them slow down.
To hear the words "cancer" and "cure" in the same sentence from experienced cancer researchers is both breathtaking and unexpected. Researchers and top oncologists are usually cautious to a fault.
Looking back I don't know if it was the inspiration of a courageous little girl who lived so close by, who was treated at the very same hospital, or our continued commitment in a world where it's hard to keep commitments, but I know that she and her siblings have gotten the message -- "when life gives you lemons, do something about it."
Smith's self-espoused "romantic" view of cancer death has nothing to do with reality. It's hard to imagine that someone who's found a successful and very public career in medicine would have such fundamental misunderstandings about one of the most prominent human diseases.
Every rider has a story at this event and cancer is our common thread. This disease impacts us all. Personally, cancer has attached itself into my closest circle of friends and family and shifted the very fibers of our lives. And frankly, like so many, I feel helpless.
To see more of Hunt and other Thiel fellows, watch Teen Technorati on Wired. [h/t Yahoo] "I believe very strongly that you
What would you do if your child had a disease or condition that mainstream medicine couldn't cure? What if you found a medicine that could help your child, but it wasn't legal or commonly accepted as mainstream medicine? Would you break the law to save your child? These are some of the questions the unfinished documentary film, Weed The People addresses.
I'm not here to tell you about a miracle that saved my daughter's life; instead of I'm here to tell you about the miracle that was her life, and how her 8 ½ years of life have left an enduring impact on the lives of other children battling cancers.
During the government shutdown, the National Institutes of Health is turning away patients for clinical trials. This includes about 30 children each week, most of them cancer patients. Take a moment to look up your representatives' stances on funding for scientific research.
Twenty years ago little was known about the aging process. Many ideas existed but nothing was certain. Today we know how and why we age. We cannot control it just yet, but even that may change in the near future.
Some weeks ago I gave birth to a child after being pregnant for more than four years. The birth was postponed several times, but finally it came; along with 12 brothers and sisters, and with more than 1,000 parents.
Did Time promise M.D. Anderson favorable coverage in return for buying the ad? Both Time and M.D. Anderson told me that did not happen. But there are reasons to be suspicious.
World Cancer Day is an opportunity to act on an urgent moral imperative, to challenge the assumption that cancers must remain untreated in poor countries, just as was successfully done for HIV treatment more than a decade ago.