cancer cure

he hope for those (like my own brother) who have what today are deemed as incurable cancers, is that they can be sustained long enough on therapies that slow down or halt cancer progression, giving the opportunity for one of the exciting new therapeutic approaches to become a reality and win the battle and ultimately the War on Cancers.
Scientists have seen small-scale successes with targeted therapeutics, and that could mean something big in the long run.
The inspiration to write and share insights with others can be manifested in many different ways. For us, like for many others we assume, such inspiration often comes from our own experiences and the physical or virtual interactions we have with fellow human beings.
More than 1.6 million Americans will receive a cancer diagnosis this year and approximately 595,690 people will die from this devastating disease -- that's 1,632 moms and dads, sons and daughters, grandparents, siblings and friends every day.
We truly believe that you never know which dollar is going to make the difference and lead to the next big discovery to help kids with cancer, and that every single dollar adds up toward making those dreams of a cure a reality.
The early bird gets the worm. Slow and steady wins the race. For those of us who are parents, these may be familiar sayings that we tell our children to either get them moving, or instead have them slow down.
To hear the words "cancer" and "cure" in the same sentence from experienced cancer researchers is both breathtaking and unexpected. Researchers and top oncologists are usually cautious to a fault.
Looking back I don't know if it was the inspiration of a courageous little girl who lived so close by, who was treated at the very same hospital, or our continued commitment in a world where it's hard to keep commitments, but I know that she and her siblings have gotten the message -- "when life gives you lemons, do something about it."
Smith's self-espoused "romantic" view of cancer death has nothing to do with reality. It's hard to imagine that someone who's found a successful and very public career in medicine would have such fundamental misunderstandings about one of the most prominent human diseases.