cannes 2014

Winter Sleep, winner of the Palme d'Or and FIPRESCI Prizes at this year's Cannes Festival, is a film centered on brilliant dialogue where the subtleties of the relationships are slowly unveiled through conversations of what's said and not said.
Godard's "adieu" is cynical. Language, he concludes, in this silver season of his life, is a failure.
Unplug and reconnect. Amazing how the message seems to resonate... or maybe not so amazing. I imagine that back in the day, some cave mom told her intense, wall-painting son to get out and hunt a mammoth or two and reconnect with what is real.
I'm always pleasantly surprised when I sit down to interview a powerful, beautiful, intelligent woman who is not afraid to mix her wisdom with her femininity. And even more amazed when she's accompanied by a man, a partner confident enough to be by her side.
While a cacophony of media and breaking news buzz around us in our daily lives, I personally need the human touch to help me understand a country or a situation. And for that human touch I turn to art, music or even better, cinema to get me to the heart of the matter.
For the first 20-odd minutes, Zak Hilditch's These Final Hours appeared to me like a really well shot, fantastically acted B movie. But then a little girl took over the screen, Rose, an intricately written, important, wise girl who changed everything.
When you put together two Indian cinema heavyweights like Dibakar Banerjee Productions and Yash Raj Films, you can't help but have a winning film.
The film Party Girl, which opened the 'Un Certain Regard' section this year in Cannes, had a very special, personal meaning for me, an extra reason to watch it...
For me, there is always a film within a festival that defies all expectations. Of course, to even choose a film from a catalogue of hundreds, it has to be on my radar for a few reasons (some truly mundane) which include favorite actor or actress, filmmaker, writer or producer.
As celebrities bid adieu to France on the final day of the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, we are taking a look back at some of
The Runner Up Prize Went To Alice Rohrwacher's "The Wonders" Everyone was in for a surprise on Saturday when a tie was announced
Cannes was full of unusual discussions and strange happenings.
As charismatic as his characters have been on-screen, that is Ranvir Shorey in person. But the man I interviewed, coming straight off his premiere, and the standing ovation the film got in the Salle Debussy, and dressed in tailored Indian fineries, was also insightful, kind, funny, intelligent and humble.
Despite its short length, The Aftermath is a full and significant film, and although bare and minimalist in look, it's crowded with expectation. It is also groundbreaking, as I've endlessly mentioned before, the first film from Egypt to be included in the Cinéfondation.
Wim Wenders and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado teamed up together to make Salt of the Earth, a documentary tribute to Sebastião Salgado, the renowned Brazilian photographer who spent 40 years "photographing the human condition," and wildlife, in over 30 countries around the world.
Michael Hogan and Eric Kohn join Ricky to weigh in on where Ryan Gosling went wrong with his directorial debut.
Here's to hoping that one day, soon, cinema may bring cultures together, and great actors, world directors and multi-lingual writers may work alongside each other to create masterpieces that can transcend borders and labels.
For a woman to manage the best lounges at the Toronto International Film Festival, Cannes, the Golden Globes and the French César Awards, one must be pretty amazing, so catching up with Dubois-Sissoko was a must.
It is one of the most stunning films in the Cannes Competition this year: Abderrahmane Sissako's Timbuktu, about individuals in Mali trying to maintain dignity and freedom despite the oppressive rules of the Jihadists invading their country.