Cape Wind

A new offshore wind farm could bring jobs to New England’s struggling fishermen.
Off-shore wind energy has long been considered an important option for renewable power especially given the focus on finding
New England better get ready for brownouts and higher electricity bills. As for oil prices, they are low now, but I have seen many, many energy price cycles over the last 45 years of watching the sector for a living. And they often come with little warning.
Part 2 of this three-part series concerning America's first offshore wind farm was an October interview with Cape Wind's Communications Director Mark Rodgers. Rodgers recently recalled the significance of Massachusetts's original windmills to the early economy of Cape Cod:
Cape Wind Communications Director Mark Rodgers reflects on the leadership required to move the project from drawing board to construction. He explains how the un-calculated or "external" costs of polluting sources of energy have inspired communities to support renewable sources of power.
With such an abundance of inexhaustible, clean power just waiting to be tapped, why has the U.S. delayed its development of offshore wind power?
If you are an environmental lawyer, there is nothing more deflating than reading a judge's decision that clinically rejects all your best arguments. I know because I have had my share of losing environmental cases.
The next time someone on the right falsely decries environmentalists for killing American jobs through lawsuits, ask them to explain why their friends in Massachusetts are doing the same thing.
March 19 (Reuters) - Cape Wind said Tuesday it expects to complete financing for its long-delayed 468-megawatt offshore wind
How many threatened birds and tortoises would you be willing to sacrifice to build a commercial wind farm, or a utility-scale solar array? It's an oversimplified way to frame things, of course, but it highlights the reality that renewable energy has environmental impacts, too.
HuffPost Senior Writer Tom Zeller joins us to discuss his piece on an ocean-based wind farm off the shores of Cape Cod and the struggle to develop offshore wind power.
Twelve years after Jim Gordon, a New England developer of natural gas plants, launched his effort to build the country's first offshore wind project, the effort is mired in a bureaucratic tangle of permits, sign-offs and lawsuits.
"We have real and looming environmental problems on the horizon," Gordon told reporters that summer, as he prepared to apply
For Massachusetts, Cape Wind is the most important clean energy project. For the nation, it's a bellwether of what's to come. Will we chose to create a clean energy future, or to repeat our dirty energy past.
Cape Spin provides an in-depth look into the well-funded political tug-of-war that has transpired since the original 2001 proposal for Cape Wind's energy project.
Until we get serious about discussing clean energy's benefits to consumers -- more choices, more energy independence, more cost savings -- and stop focusing on how politics gets in the way, the industry will fight to go mainstream.
When I picked up my copy of this week's Time magazine, I was momentarily stopped in my tracks by Massimo Calabresi's cover story: "Hillary Clinton and the Rise of Smart Power."
It is hard to imagine a new angle on the Cape Wind project. However, one item that deserves some attention: jobs and what the Massachusetts utility regulator's decision to approve the project means for new energy technology.
"We are trying to build the capacity of community leaders who are on the frontlines of these issues so that they can address