Cape Wind

A new offshore wind farm could bring jobs to New England’s struggling fishermen.
Off-shore wind energy has long been considered an important option for renewable power especially given the focus on finding
New England better get ready for brownouts and higher electricity bills. As for oil prices, they are low now, but I have seen many, many energy price cycles over the last 45 years of watching the sector for a living. And they often come with little warning.
Part 2 of this three-part series concerning America's first offshore wind farm was an October interview with Cape Wind's Communications Director Mark Rodgers. Rodgers recently recalled the significance of Massachusetts's original windmills to the early economy of Cape Cod:
Cape Wind Communications Director Mark Rodgers reflects on the leadership required to move the project from drawing board to construction. He explains how the un-calculated or "external" costs of polluting sources of energy have inspired communities to support renewable sources of power.
With such an abundance of inexhaustible, clean power just waiting to be tapped, why has the U.S. delayed its development of offshore wind power?
If you are an environmental lawyer, there is nothing more deflating than reading a judge's decision that clinically rejects all your best arguments. I know because I have had my share of losing environmental cases.
The next time someone on the right falsely decries environmentalists for killing American jobs through lawsuits, ask them to explain why their friends in Massachusetts are doing the same thing.
A unit of UK bank Barclays Plc will continue to advise Cape Wind on raising the remaining financing needed, Cape Wind said
How many threatened birds and tortoises would you be willing to sacrifice to build a commercial wind farm, or a utility-scale solar array? It's an oversimplified way to frame things, of course, but it highlights the reality that renewable energy has environmental impacts, too.