carbon pollution

In addition to scrapping our current Clean Air Act and other regulatory tools, the sponsors propose immunizing carbon polluters
The issues confronting America's energy sector today are arguably more complex and urgent than at any other time in the nation's history. We are the middle of a very disruptive energy revolution.
It is hard to explain the way carbon, methane and ozone in the atmosphere cause the Earth to heat up. It is easier, I am telling my environmentalist friends, to understand that we will not be able to swim in the oceans.
Last year's Paris Climate Agreement at COP21 marked a paradigm shift in the international response to climate change. Few can deny that COP21, thanks in part to Europe's leadership, achieved the first multilateral climate agreement since the Kyoto Protocol.
Earth Day is one of the best times of the year to remember responsible environmental stewardship appeals to all Americans.
Image of air pollution by jokerpro via Shutterstock For example, detailed technology and policy roadmaps can be highly valuable
Some observers immediately suggested that the stay vote portends the Plan's eventual defeat if it returns to the Supreme Court on the merits. That conclusion is unwarranted, in my view.
Just days after the federal court of appeals in Washington rejected their bid to block President Obama's Clean Power Plan, the coal industry and its political allies are pleading for immediate relief from the U.S. Supreme Court.
The Clean Power Plan, the centerpiece of the Obama Administration's climate protection actions, got a big boost last week when the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington rejected bids by the coal industry and its political allies for a "stay" of implementation.
Progress brings a new burden: to tell the history of how the air got cleaned up. And to get across what it will take to meet future challenges -- like curbing climate change.
2015 was hot. 2015 was also the year the world decided to beat the heat. This year is on track to be the hottest on record world-wide. Temperatures will reach the 70s on Christmas day in the Nation's Capital.
The president must understand a simple fact: Fossil fuels have to stay in the ground.
This is a moment when the human community rose to the challenge of the times. On Saturday, more than 190 nations agreed to cut climate change pollution, transition to clean energy and put the world on a course toward ever-increasing climate action. As President Francois Hollande observed, this is the first universal climate agreement in history.
Senator and presidential candidate Ted Cruz (R-TX) trotted out his "there's-been-no-warming-for-18-years" schtick during a Senate hearing and Retired Rear Admiral David Titley (a meteorologist and oceanographer) very patiently explained to him why he's mistaken.
The world continues to grieve those lost in the recent tragic attacks in Paris. More than ever, The City of Light is the right place to gather to accelerate clean energy, justice and resilience and to enable the world's people to achieve a sustainable future.
Focused commitment to address climate change is a challenge and an opportunity for the people of Illinois. Failure to make the necessary commitments is an unambiguous danger to our property, our health and safety and quality of life.
Encouraging other countries to deal with climate change while ignoring carbon emissions here is not really dealing with the problem at all. Dealing with climate starts by dealing with carbon pollution here at home.
This shocking way of doing business has revealed an important truth in the fight against climate change: the value of government safeguards and government oversight in protecting public health and reducing dangerous pollution.
The Obama administration is finally trying to deal with climate change in a comprehensive way. Distracted in his first term by the recession and health care the President did not have the capacity to push the Waxman-Markey bill through the Senate.
Opponents of the Clean Power Plan seem united in their belief that solving climate change is either unnecessary or should be very low on the list of national priorities. Their ideology remains fixed in a world of polluting energy. Fortunately for our children and grandchildren, the rest of us are moving forward.