caregiver stress

It is an extremely tough job, and only gets harder. Make sure you seek help.
Marie Marley is the award-winning author of 'Come Back Early Today: A Memoir of Love, Alzheimer's and Joy' and co-author
The truth is, caring for aging parents is an experience that's hard to relate to unless you're going through it. None of us can easily imagine just what life is like with a parent who needs help doing the simplest things like eating, getting in and out of bed or God forbid, going to the bathroom
When you're the main caregiver for a loved one, it's easy to become completely absorbed by all of your caregiving responsibilities. As your day moves along, you're so busy from one moment to the next that before you know it, the sun is setting and you never even stopped for lunch.
Trial and error as an Alzheimer's caregiver taught me that it's better to be patient than to be right. That golden rule and the two magic words 'OK Mom' rescued my sanity on many a day as advancing Alzheimer's tightened its grip on my mother Peg.
Alzheimer's care had begun to take its toll. Exhausted, a light bulb finally turned on in my head: If something doesn't change
Alzheimer's caregiving is the toughest job I've ever known but it also vividly distills what's really important in life. For five and a half years, I cared for my mother, Peg Swiss, as advanced Alzheimer's tightened its grip on her brain.
Two and a half years after my husband George died of cancer, I am still mired in shame and regret because I was such a poor caregiver to him. Images of me angry, yelling at him, continue to haunt me.
A common locus of invisible need is found in the families struggling with Alzheimer's. One single person may have the disease, but the impact is felt by an entire family. And the ripples alter an entire faith community.
Now that the curtain has fallen I derive immense personal satisfaction for my devotion to duty. Do I recall promising something
And I don't know about you, but I want to keep my loved ones in their homes as long as possible. Let's start to change the way we think about caregiving in a way that doesn't force one to sacrifice her (and hopefully his!) own health to help others.
I learned that, paradoxically, caring for someone you love can be an intensely lonely road; simultaneously a time of near constant togetherness and a time of profound isolation. And I believe this isolation can be as devastating to the caregiver as any affliction is to the person being cared for.
More than half of the caregivers were women, and more than a third reported caring for a parent. About one in four people
Although it was difficult for me to master the new approaches, when I finally did our relationship blossomed again and life with him was much more peaceful and emotionally rewarding.
People with Alzheimer's disease can become upset and agitated about things that happen to them. And when you, as the caregiver, witness your loved one's anguish, you may become distressed, too -- sometimes more so than your loved one.
No one wants to place their loved one with Alzheimer's in a nursing facility. But sometimes, that's the best (or only) alternative, especially for those in the mid to late stages of the disease.
You will probably need to grieve before you can truly accept the situation. You will need to grieve the loss of the person
When a loved one doesn't recognize you, it's as though you no longer exist in their world. It can cause searing pain. But ultimately, this is a situation that only hurts you. It typically doesn't bother them. And that's what matters.
The entry continues by saying that people with a higher level of education appear to be protected against Alzheimer's, concluding