Carole Bayer Sager

Sager's five-decade songwriting career is among the most impressive in all of the music business. But after writing hit after hit, Sager's most recent offering is not a song at all. She has penned her memoir.
A Conversation with Burt Bacharach Mike Ragogna: Burt, the title of your new Blu-ray is A Life In Song. That may sound like
It'd renew my faith in the government. Lastly, fantasy football is in full swing. Have you ever tried to draft a unicorn
Sager, the singer-songwriter who's collaborated with Bette Midler, Barbara Streisand, Neil Diamond and Quincy Jones over
Truth is, Tyrell's effortlessly infallible phrasing has the effect of making what he does appealingly conversational. The emotion he's experiencing is a component of his seemingly off-handed -- smile-smile-smile -- style. Let's just say he's singing for all generations.
"People say that the internet democratized music, which it did in that it allows people to make records without getting the hallowed record deal, because you have all these home studios and stuff. The problem is marketing yourself."
Somehow it seems appropriate that a pop songwriter is so fascinated by a Pop art style -- the giant blow-ups of common food being part of the lexicon of such Pop greats as Andy Warhol and Claes Oldenburg.
Carole Bayer Sager was surrounded by family and friends last night for a private reception at the West Hollywood gallery
According to singer Michael McDonald, "I remember thinking, 'God, why [is Motown] asking me to do this?' At the same time, I wanted so badly to do it and I wouldn't allow myself to say no."