Casey Kasem

I now know I'm strong enough to withstand insurmountable grief and pain, after all, I watch a woman face hers every day. Thanks to my friend who fights the good fight and teaches me how to live courageously through it.
Inspired by TV's Little House On The Prairie, writer/director Dane Whitlock's outrageous parody, Prairie-oke, won raves during its 2013 premiere at Silver Lake's Cavern Club (incidentally L.A.'s best underground theatre space).
In the video below, Stevens joins HuffPost Live and talks more about how he's been able to stay sober for three decades. Shadoe
It’s been more than two months since Casey Kasem died following years of battling dementia and a burial site has finally been chosen.
I also spent more than a decade in hospice care, where our care team sought to companion families, many like Kasem's, in finding sacred consonance in the midst of fear, pain, death, and grief, all inherently dissonant experiences.
Millions of us never find out exactly what's causing Mom to start cursing or a diligent husband to forget to pay bills. Even after memory loss and cognitive glitches become impossible to ignore, families don't always seek (or receive) an official diagnosis. We just deal with the effects.
When the legendary radio personality Casey Kasem died, his obituary said he'd suffered from Lewy Body disease. 'Lewy-what?' most people wondered. But I knew first-hand, watching my mother decline from this little-known, but most common, type of progressive dementia after Alzheimer's.
The first thing that stands out is how many of these songs were what Jody Rosen recently described as schlock in a fantastic
On Father's Day June 15, 2014, the world lost Casey Kasem. I identified with Casey because we were both music lovers, both short and both very friendly. But also, we were both committed to supporting cancer patients in need of help.
His show arrived right at the moment when it seemed like America was coming apart, culturally, spiritually, and politically -- and promised us, in a tone that was relentlessly upbeat yet somehow never smarmy, that we actually could be one nation under a groove, that for three or four hours we could share a common bond.