Catholic voters

Trump overwhelmingly captured the votes of white Christians. In part, that support reflected Trump's opposition to abortion
The Washington Post reports that he is behind with Catholic voters by 27 percentage points.
The U.S. Catholic bishops took a beating at the polls. Not only was President Obama reelected, despite their attacks on him, the bishops also lost on state referendums on same-sex marriage.
Though we may feel as if we share little more than a zip-code with the voters beside us, in truth we share that great American feast and tradition: the ballot box. Nov. 6 is our festival day.
This has been happening to me my entire life. My "Catholicism" seems to rest on my belief about one single, solitary scenario: what to do about an unexpected pregnancy. How, in a world filled with as much trouble as ours, did my faith get reduced to that singular question?
Nothing is ever simple when it comes to Catholicism and politics. In 1996 and 2004 neither party's candidate was invited to the Al Smith Dinner. This year, conservative Catholics have been inundating the host, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, with demands to disinvite President Obama.
When a Catholic candidate speaks about his or her faith, it's more important for voters to concentrate on their policies, rather than trying to worm their way into the person's soul.
Even while affirming an indispensable role for the private ordering of the economy, Catholic social teaching demands state intervention when necessary to provide for the common good of all.
Catholics know what's at stake, and they're making up their own minds despite the influence the bishops claim, or the relative importance the hierarchy's influence and divisive campaigns garner in the media.