Caucasus

The Caucasus resort's chairlift switched to reverse at high speeds as mangled carriers piled up at the terminal.
For most Americans today, Russia is more an annoyance than a threat. But if you live in Georgia, a small country on Russia's southern border, the Kremlin remains a menacing presence. If the Russian bear becomes hungry, Georgia might be a morsel too tempting to resist.
Armenia and Russia: A Tightening Partnership In addition to stoking fears of uncontrolled popular revolutions that could
The specter of foreign powers and their lobbyists distorting America's democratic system may worry ordinary Americans, but it seems that few inside the Beltway share their concerns.
Goodbye, Azerbajian. It would be dishonest to say that we Europeans will miss you; few people over here will even notice that you've left. But it's sad to see you leaving the family nonetheless.
This is the year that global warming and its man-made causes have raced to the top of headlines worldwide, including recently at the United Nations.
Foreign policy pundits have had a rough time recently in Washington, D.C.
Some voices in Washington and Moscow, are already expressing the worst nationalist, conspiracy and warmonger views, that will lead to the worst, simply by the vicious circle of foolishness and resentment.
If there were a Mt. Rushmore of Georgian dishes, khinkali would be George Washington.
The independent TV network Dozhd -- where the band's two jailed members held a press conference after their release -- might be taken off air throughout Russia anytime soon.
While Mr. Putin may rightly bask in the light of his many accomplishments in foreign policy, and having presided over the energy boom that thrived during much of his first term in office, he is now faced with some serious issues that cast a pall over Sochi.
A walk down Rustaveli Avenue, so named after a 12th Century Georgian poet, on a cold January morning allowed me to appreciate some of the country's history, which my guide recounted with relish.
The origins of the recent bombings and the terror threat that hangs over the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi lies in this region once known as the "Graveyard of the Russian Empire." And ironically enough, it does have to do with freedom as Bush stated in his explanation, only in this case the Caucasian mountaineers' loss of their freedom.
It is that time of year again when analysts are asked to put on their thinking cap and try to predict what the coming 12 months may hold for some the more troubled regions of the world. This is by no means a simple exercise.
Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan seem to be well-kept secrets from many Western travelers. With a fascinating history, a plethora of attractions and relatively low prices, the region shouldn't stay a secret for long.
Tbilisi may be one of the great art nouveau cities of Europe, but it's one that hasn't received the recognition it deserves - and perhaps by the time it does, it'll be too late.
My daughter -- along with everyone else's sons and daughters, those who we will have to entrust with leading our nation in the future -- already has no choice but to be attuned to the mosaic of peoples who occupy the dots on the world map.
One doesn't hear, for example, stories of Azeris becoming radicalized and murdering innocent people at marathons or anywhere
Svaneti, the most famous and far-flung of Georgia's mountain provinces, has come to represent an idolized version of what is typically Georgian: a land of folk-heroes and strange mists, of crumbling towers and sacrificed goats.