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The Chinese politician's power is still checked by the norms of collective leadership.
The emergence of a new global power has often profoundly shifted the geopolitical landscape and caused considerable discomfort
Beijing’s engagement in South Africa is amongst the most varied and complicated of any of its ties in Africa.
SINGAPORE -- At its fourth plenary of the 18th congress in October 2014, the Chinese Communist Party leadership passed an ambitious reform plan on the legal system. The party devoted this entire plenary session to discuss "rule of law" -- something unprecedented in the history of the party's plenary sessions. This act was widely interpreted as the Xi Jinping leadership's determination to build a system of "rule of law" in the country.
China may be more explicit about "Internet sovereignty," but the U.S. and other Western nations themselves have encouraged the emergence of virtual borders as both a prudent response to the demands of civil society and as a means to promote their preferred modes of governance. China simply represents an extreme example of a much wider phenomena.
Can China put an end to police brutality while crippling civil society?
If China fails to turbocharge its capacity to innovate, the country will experience a hard economic landing and social stability will be threatened. But can China evolve into an innovation powerhouse? The jury is out.
On July 21, 2010, President Obama signed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (hereafter, DF), the most sweeping financial regulatory reform in the United States since the 1930s. Let's have a look at the most noteworthy accomplishments and the biggest failings so far.
It happened earlier this month when Shawn Jorden, 25, was handed his degrees in Psychology and Liberal Arts from the Community College of Philadelphia, a goal that he had initially thought was out of reach.
As time goes on (six years to be exact), two women go from teacher to student to friends to equals and finally rivals, as the unthinkable happens and a huge betrayal occurs.
So many thoughts started to form in my mind as my row started to join the long line of graduates. It amazed me at the time, and it still does on occasion, that a kid from North Philadelphia who originally had no plans on attending an institution of higher learning was now graduating from college again.
This is an important moment in history. The Hong Kong protesters must stand their ground. This is not 1989, nor is it Tiananmen Square. The people of Hong Kong represent the future of China -- not the other way around.
Both Miller and others see the Irish Theater as a way to enrich themselves further in the art of acting by learning and working along with professionals of the field.
"Li Keqiang is pushing for urbanisation. The countryside will be the main battlefield," one source with leadership ties told
However paradoxical it may sound to Westernears, the Chinese government has succeeded by drawing upon sources of non-democratic legitimacy.
June Dreyer posits four scenarios for the future of China in her book. One can argue in favor of any of the scenarios she discusses. The intricacies of this topic will be salient to United States foreign policy making for years to come.
Bo Xilai, the populist former Chongqing chief recently purged from China's Politburo, was a dangerous, recidivistic force in Chinese politics. His fate should be cheered. Yes, his ouster reveals the dark side of the country's cloak-and-dagger leadership.