CEDAW

Naila Amin paints a picture of a village near the mountains, of cows lazily ambling through the fields that surround it, of
Our culture's current lack of understanding of women as full human beings must evolve into a conviction that indivisible rights include freedom from unfettered male sexual access, from female genital mutilation to child marriage; from reproductive health to sexual violence; from sexual harassment to prostitution. Achieving equality depends on it.
Women in the United States have strived for, and achieved, equality in many areas, and have some freedoms that are unparalleled in many countries around the world. However, despite the United States' array of legal protections, women continue to face barriers to equality and the full enjoyment of their human rights.
This catastrophic event indicated to us once more that enacting rules or making reforms cannot by themselves help to empower women and prevent violence. The government of Turkey should focus much more on internalization of the reforms (like those it pioneered once upon a time) to prevent them from being merely cosmetic.
The U.S. is the only Western and industrialized democracy not to have ratified CEDAW, joining the likes of Iran, South Sudan, and Somalia as holdouts regarding the global norms for women's equality.
The International Day of the Girl Child is on a par with the worthy treaties some world leaders sign and then fail to implement. 190 governments have ratified the Convention on the Rights of Children.
A marauding misogynist Taliban in the style of Islamic State is not a fantasy, and the Security Council could envision such an outcome with a resolution that would surely garner a wide consensus of support.
As conservative agendas of governments around the world decrease the opportunities for women, it is vitally important that women work in solidarity with those still struggling for basic human rights as well as with those facing a roll-back of gains made.
This is a no brainer public policy; there is no reason that the United States of America should not ratify this treaty as the world leader on national security and a defender of human rights.
Although the UN does important humanitarian work, it is overgrown with the weeds of a dysfunctional bureaucracy and spineless leadership, and has become a watering hole for states that are prepared to sanction sex discrimination and extremist ideology without fear of serious challenge by the world body.