cell phone addiction

An artistic invention designed to make your ever-growing addiction to your smart phone all the more comfortable.
I take photos of my children, and in moments when they seem to feel less than special, I pull them out and we retell the stories within them. I use them as a tool to help them remember the details of those moments.
I was mad that my cell phone was locked in my car. I couldn't scroll Facebook or other social media. I couldn't check my email. I couldn't even call someone or text without asking to borrow a phone. Without my cell phone I felt like I was sitting in that restaurant stark naked and I didn't like it one bit.
The status quo of being busy and distracted is affecting all of our lives. By being intentional and simplifying, we will reap benefits and rewards that only come with conscious attention to habits.
Some people can't just watch one episode of OINTB - they need to see the whole series in one sitting. Others can't enjoy a slice of cake - they must eat the whole thing, and lick the icing off the plate.
Through his research, Greenfield said a vast majority of people not only admit to checking their cell phones while driving
We can't help ourselves. We naturally want more of what makes us feel happy, at ease or socially accepted. Because addiction often is born from pleasure and convenience, even the most innocuous things can become addictive.
There you are, out for lunch you can hardly taste, spending your free hour nodding blankly at your companion, constantly asking for a sentence repeat. Now and again, you smile with a Huh? face, and never at quite the appropriate moment.
And I find it amusing (and somewhat disconcerting) that people make excuses to escape whoever they are supposed to be spending time with so that they can check in with other people who may not even be real-life friends.
Heavy stuff. But researchers like Roberts, who created his own scale for measuring addictive cell phone behavior, are building