central american refugees

Stalled by bureaucracy and lack of transparency, it's helped very few.
By Bill O'Keefe Donors to Catholic Relief Services (CRS) know their gifts improve the lives of millions of people in over
Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said the enforcement efforts aren't changing, despite criticism.
The raids are targeting undocumented mothers and children from Central America.
In his final State of the Union address President Obama focused on the importance of American leadership, both what it has
Immigrant Defense Project (IDP) has monitored ICE raids and "community arrests" since 2013, and we've uncovered troubling patterns and rights abuses in the targeting of people with criminal records.
If we are truly to act based on principles of "decency, fairness, and humanity," the forcible removal of precisely the people most likely to have been mistreated under the current immigration court system is both inhumane and illogical.
As an undocumented immigrant, I was familiar with the realities of detention centers, but I never thought I'd find myself in one, even as a visitor. When I was eight, my family and I immigrated to the Miami-metro area from South America.
Following mounting public pressure in the form of large demonstrations, negative national press coverage, and a hunger strike inside its facilities, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced a series of changes to its deceptively named, "family residential centers."
It's in this context that the emotional flare-up over undocumented Central American children crossing the southern border by the thousands took place. In fact, without the process of militarization, that "debate" -- with its discussion of "invasions," "surges," "terrorists," and "tip of the spear" solutions -- makes no sense.
Lines at the Costa Rican consulate in Managua are far longer than lines at the U.S. consulate. According to official statistics, at least ten percent of the population of Costa Rica is made up of Nicaraguans, although the population of clandestine migrants is huge.
Lines at the Costa Rican consulate in Managua are far longer than lines at the U.S. consulate. According to official statistics, at least ten percent of the population of Costa Rica is made up of Nicaraguans, although the population of clandestine migrants is huge.
Forget about the pursuit of the American dream, an American education, or an American job. They are simply trying to stay alive.