Central Europe

Diane Stone, University of Canberra Ignoring protest from around the world, the Hungarian government has fast-tracked legislation
Co-Author Zuzana Palovic - CEE and Migration Expert With over 500 delegates attending, all VIPs, the event featured EU luminaries
The previous government made some serious steps in this direction, just to mention a very efficient "Maluch" (Little kid
"Nothing is riskier than not taking risks. Even though Sotheby's is a traditional and conservative organization, we have
Advice for Young People It is more important to live than to have. A meaningful life connects people to a larger sense of
The term "personal democracy" aims to draw attention to the fact that new technologies related to the Internet and mobile
If an American wants to experience pure capitalism, they should leave Chicago and come to Budapest. No local politician in Illinois would be allowed to say the things that any Polish, Hungarian politician says: "Oh, you have nothing to eat? Well, you should be more enterprising!"
Small countries often have no choice but to align themselves with larger economic entities, as for instance the Baltic countries have done inside the European Union. But Poland is not a small country. It is the sixth largest EU country by population, and the largest country in East-Central Europe (twice the size of its nearest competitor, Romania).
While Slovenia is commonly overlooked in European vacations, it is one of the most beautiful countries. Not only is the food amazing and the people friendly, the country never feels tourist heavy. No matter the restaurant, bar or museum, it feels as if you are always surrounded by locals.
The topics of strengthening the transatlantic partnership and advancing economic freedom were brought to the forefront, when we gathered in Brussels at a dinner event of the Konrad Adenauer Foundation in December 2014.
In an interview in Warsaw in August 2013, Dariusz Kalan, a Central Europe expert with the Polish Institute for International Affairs (PISM), talked about Poland's attempt to represent the region in European bodies, why young people are leaning toward conservative movements, and how Central Europe views Russia.
Whereas the North American Holocaust museum deals with the immense crimes perpetrated by the Nazis, the Warsaw museum is focused most of all on of Jewish life.
The social distance between Roma and non-Roma communities in Europe is quite large. In other words, there is not a great deal of mixing between the two communities.
If you haven't noticed, there is something going on in Eastern Europe that resembles the bad old days of the Cold War.
"-White Places-Black Holes" was proclaimed both publicly and privately as the best congress in recent memory, reflecting both in structure and content, the death and rebirth of art criticism in the 21st century.
The debate continues over whether the people of East-Central Europe have benefitted economically from the post-1989 transition. But this discussion of economic winners and losers largely ignores a key demand of the people in the region.
The glory days of Central Europe as the center of attention, the drivers of tectonic changes, is now faded memory.
On March 17, 1990, I set off from Brussels for East Berlin to begin what would be seven months of wandering around the region. Now, I am returning to track down the people I interviewed back then to see how their lives, their families, and their countries have changed.
The United States, and in fact, the rest of the world, especially the fear-driven crisis-mongering media and markets, could learn a few things by slowing down, realizing it takes time to build healthy economies, especially such a new one as the European Union.