charles schulz

The TV special nearly didn't happen, but cartoonist Charles Schulz stood by his beliefs.
Fifty years ago, on October 27, 1966, It's The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown debuted on CBS. A lot was riding on the success of this animated feature.
The Snoopy Plate was created in California following legislation in 2013. Proceeds from the sales go to the California Cultural and Historical Endowment to help museums make capital improvements to their facilities, which helps keep their doors open to the public.
Lucy tries primal scream therapy; raises fee to six cents. Schroeder goes "electric," Pete Seeger chases after him with an axe. Russians launch surprise first strike, Linus and Lucy catch nuclear ash on their tongues
One of those sponsors, Coca-Cola, became interested in Peanuts again and asked Mendelson to work up a pitch for a Christmas special featuring the characters. Mendelson very quickly jotted down ideas and many of his initial ideas made their way into the special (most notably "sad tree").
Since this is the shopping "holiday" Cyber Monday, which follows the more grimly named Black Friday, we should perhaps listen to the message of A Charlie Brown Christmas, which tonight on ABC marks its 50th anniversary as a television classic.
This October marks 65 years since the first publication of Charles M. Schulz' Peanuts. Decades have passed, yet the diffident and often times wistful Charlie Brown still holds a place in the hearts of millions.
Charlie Brown and the gang know how to celebrate Christmas, Halloween and every holiday in between with classic "Peanuts
The character of Peppermint Patty was inspired by Patricia Swanson, one of Schulz's cousins on his mother's side. Schulz