chavismo

The comparative exercise requires us to calculate the real GDP (absent inflation) and do so in U.S. dollar terms for both
Venezuela is at the mercy of its fluids. For a country that depends on oil for 95 percent of its exports, the prolonged drop
VALENCIA, Venezuela -- My dad's diagnosis came a couple days before Christmas: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, stage III. The doctors planned his first dose of chemotherapy for mid-January. But because of Venezuela's deadly drug shortage, he had to bring everything to the clinic -- from the drugs to the needles to the saline solution. And with cancer, time is key. So we went on a mad dash search to find the medicine any way we could.
An expert discusses the significance of Venezuela's recent elections and Chavez's legacy.
As Venezuela's political opposition celebrates its first electoral victory in 17 years by gaining control of the national legislature, uncertainty still bedevils the country's political landscape. Once the euphoria of victory subsides, a new phase of escalating confrontation will ensue between President Nicolás Maduro and the new opposition-led congress.
I had the privilege of interviewing Bituaya, a very diverse Venezuelan band -- with roots in the Afro-Venezuela, indigenous and white communities -- that fuses electronic and Caribbean music.
So how could a tiny party created a year ago become a major player? Corruption is part of the explanation. Podemos' surge followed a string of high-profile scandals enmeshing members of the two main parties.
After zigging toward liberalization, by suggesting a reduction in the gasoline subsidy or letting the bolívar devalue, and zagging back away, the only continuity is that Maduro is gradually displacing the original chavista high guard.
With less than two months since President Hugo Chavez's death and barely half the votes, Maduro has no popular mandate but will undoubtedly claim one by continuing to relentlessly invoke the name of Hugo Chavez.
Though the interventionist role of the military has mostly disappeared across Latin America today, the temptation of populist politics remains. Indeed, today, the temptation is greater than ever as democracy joins with a politically active middle class.
As the first images of Hugo Chavez emerge after a two-month media blackout, the issue of post-Chavez Venezuela takes center stage once again. The bottom line is that without its chief protagonist, Chavismo will ultimately wither away over time.
"We have no doubt Mr. Aveledo is behind the campaign of sick rumors that began on Twitter and Facebook," Maduro said. On
After much speculation, President Hugo Chávez announced that he now had a person in mind to succeed him -- Nicolás Maduro, the minister of foreign affairs who was elevated to vice president in October. So who is Maduro, and will he ever command the loyalty of chavistas?
Mr. Chávez was quick to emphasize his centrist position during his victory speech. But does this mean that we are likely to see a more moderate Chavismo in the next few years?
Feeling a clear and present danger from Team Obama's new bases designed to contain the FARC, Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez is threatening retaliation and cutting off oil exports to his top customer, the U.S.