Chen Guangcheng

China has a tendency to make prognosticators look foolish. Still, I'll happily make one prediction for 2014: at least one China story will break that has a fact-is-stranger-than-fiction feel to it.
Chen's rebelliousness, which make him admirable when pitted against a repressive regime, seem to have made the simple end of a fellowship a significant PR liability for a, presumably, well-intended NYU.
Yesterday, as American leaker Edward Snowden made his headline-grabbing flight from Hong Kong to Moscow, the blind Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng left New York to spend time in Taiwan.
If the corporate thinking that places profits over our own humanity has begun to invade the American university system, causing it to bow to pressure from some of the worst human rights violators in our world today in favor of expansion into the Chinese market, it has gone too far.
That included hidden keystroke-tracking software and bugging software that would allow someone to eavesdrop on conversations
"Chen's lack of academic qualifications and language competence meant he could not stay long-term. His embarrassing situation
After his James Bond-like escape from house arrest with a broken foot in the dark last spring, blind Chinese lawyer Chen Guangcheng slipped to the U.S. embassy in Beijing -- and special arrangements took him to asylum at NYU Law School. And now Chen is being asked to leave NYU.
Chen Guangcheng, a blind Chinese dissident and human rights activist, released a statement Sunday insisting that communist
The growing preoccupation with trade threatens to sideline the wider issue of how best to promote human rights and democratic reform in China, a country whose political future is set to determine the course of the 21st century.
Chen Guangcheng is the blind civil rights advocate from rural China who escaped house arrest in April 2012 and fled to the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. Then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton negotiated his temporary stay in the U.S. to study law at NYU. I interviewed him recently.
With the single exception of granting asylum to the blind Chinese human rights activist Chen Guangcheng, the Obama administration's record on Christian persecution in China has been one largely of indifference.
Chen Guangcheng is often referred to in the press as a "Chinese dissident," but he does not seek the overthrow of the CCP. He rather wants to see the Party live by its own rulebook.
Human rights organizations and people of goodwill must step forward to stand with Chen and other human rights heroes in China who are daily facing down Goliath on behalf of their fellow citizens.
Out of the ashes of the Second World War emerged a Utopia vision -- rather than solve problems through military means, we could maintain the peace by investing across borders and promoting human rights.
Despite the promise of wider editorial latitude, CCTV America's coverage of China is largely scrubbed of controversy and upbeat in tone, with a heavy emphasis on business and cultural stories in places where Beijing hopes to gain influence.
"This is an opportunity for me to share with the world the true conditions in China, especially in the vast stretches of
As it continues to globalize and navigate choppy political waters, promoting values such as academic freedom and human rights must remain an enduring part of NYU's global posture.
Two decades ago, the Chinese government's crackdown in Tiananmen Square left hundreds of my fellow students dead. Since then a new generation has grown up in China, and many of them are kept in the dark about what happened on this day in China's history.
Since I arrived in the United States on May 19, people have asked me, "What do you want to do here?" I have come here to
His son, Chen Kegui, 32, was charged with "intentional homicide" for using knives to fend off local officials who burst into