chick lit

What makes a family? What does it take to do what you love in life? These are some of the questions I considered while reading
If you're an author with aspirations of seeing your work adapted for film or TV, people love to look at you like you're a sad puppy. "Oh, but movies are never as good as the book," they say. But is that really true? Happily, no.
I've long espoused the tenet that writers should write about what they know and write the kind of books they like to read
Are you looking to take a break from the holiday shuffle, sink into your favorite chair by the tree, and read? If so, here's some books to help restore your holiday spirit.
I've been blessed to become friends with a number of local authors, such as the generous and wickedly funny Holly Robinson. Holly's latest book came out October 6, and she was kind enough to take a few minutes to talk with me about it.
Anne Wagener has been a bridesmaid 10 times. She has transformed her experiences -- good, bad, and hilarious -- into a delightful first romantic novel, Borrow a Bridesmaid. It's also a portal into the minds and hearts of 21st century 20-somethings.
Most writers have on their laptops at least one draft of a novel that is about 100 pages long. It's the sort of project that starts out strong and inspired but soon loses steam. And so it sits, until the Muse strikes again. And it often sits there for a long time.
The strength in these feminist empowerment projects is clear to fans who use them to navigate their own lives, but I want to highlight the message for other artists: use creativity to carve your identity and empower others.
Why are we so precious about what we read? Admitting to a guilty pleasure TV shows is the stuff of Cool Girl celebrity profiles. Plenty of brilliant women are open about the "Real Housewives" backlog on their DVRs, but loving un-literary books still feels like a shameful secret.
Recently a literary festival asked me to appear on a panel of regional 'Women Writers.' I'm early enough in my career as a novelist that I'm damned grateful to be invited anywhere, but the panel title gave me pause.