child refugees

Resources and assistance are crucial for refugees hoping to create a new life. What is also necessary for these individuals, especially children, is a sense of normalcy and an outlet to express themselves.
Every day, thousands of people in Syria make the terrifying decision to leave. At some moment on some day, they declare they've had enough. They gather the family, pack just the possessions they'll need for survival into the few bags they'll be able to carry, and head toward an uncertain future.
They were so young, and yet looked so sad. I looked into the faces of these children... hundreds of them... all gathered together at a UNICEF program in Malawi, one of the countries hardest hit by AIDS.
In 2012, my children and I awoke to the sound of heavy clashes erupting outside of our home in Qudsaya, Syria. We could hear the sound of bullets and gunfire dangerously close to us. I was scared and on the verge of tears, but I refused to let my children see me cry.
"Violence and trauma do more than harm individual children - they undermine the strength of societies," Lake said. UNICEF
With counseling and psychosocial support, young lives devastated by war and childhoods violently taken away can be reclaimed. We see it happen when they begin to smile again, laugh again, and play again.
The new refugee caseload now joins the Darfur refugees from the east who have lived in Chad for more than 10 years. In looking at the geographic pressures from all sides, Chad prepares to become the Jordan of Africa, the eye of the regional storm.
The media stories have been legion, the words expended many. And yet, as attention shifts elsewhere (even though the children continue to arrive), the real factors that would have made sense of what's been happening remain essentially untouched and largely unmentioned. It couldn't be stranger -- or sadder.
Since the beginning of the year, more than 57,000 children have arrived to the U.S.-Mexico border in hopes of escaping gang
Removing the age cap and changing the criteria to allow more DREAMers to qualify may be the easiest thing that Obama could do.