children of color

Police shootings and the pandemic have created added anxiety and pressure on kids of color. Here's one way parents can help.
"For parents who are raising children of color, there’s an added dynamic."
The Harvard Gazette has released a series of articles on inequality in America. They describe Harvard University scholars’ efforts across a range of disciplines to identify and understand this nation-defining and dividing concern and possible solutions.
The new Every Student Succeeds Act begins a new era, but it is one without needed federal accountability and with the hopes that states will fulfill their crucial responsibility to educate all their children fairly and prepare them for work and life.
The national holiday celebrating Dr. King's birthday is over, but I hope we will heed and act on his 1967 declaration and work to win the first victory right here at home in the biggest economy on earth and end the shame of 14.7 million children being the poorest Americans by ending child poverty now.
With a Masters from Brown University in Environmental Studies, a PhD in Urban Planning and Public Policy, and a teaching post at the New School for Public Engagement, Ana Baptista is well-equipped to move the needle on the environmental issues facing marginalized groups in American urban settings.
For the first time in 13 years, the DOE now makes clear that states, school districts, and schools must make education resources equally available to all students without regard to race, color, or national origin. This is some of the unfinished business of the civil rights movement and a giant step forward for poor children, often children of color.
When communities are able to integrate their classrooms, students are more able to learn the most important lesson American education provides -- the respect for and commitment to continuing the diverse social mosaic that has distinguished our country for generations.
School "reform" is only one of the indignities that my kids face. The high-stakes testing that is driving meaningful instruction out of the urban classrooms is just one cross that my kids must carry.
The loneliness of that realization, that my daughter might have to shoulder the consequences of these stigmas, made me heartsick. I'd made myself believe she would only be challenged by her race and gender, not the basic ability to speak her mind.