children technology

The tales they see and hear there can feed their own developing literacy.
Your own family can take a page out of the McMillan family book of parenting and limit tech use in a number of simple ways
It's a conversation all parents will have -- it's only a matter of when. It starts with "Puleeeeeeze! All my friends have one!" Kids -- all kids -- want one, badly. The target of their desires, of course, is the ubiquitous, must-have cell phone.
Sedentary bodies bombarded with chaotic sensory stimulation are resulting in delays in attaining child developmental milestones, with subsequent negative impact on basic foundation skills for achieving literacy.
I don't know how long I'll be able to oversee Amalia's use of media. But this weekend brought me a flicker of hope that Amalia may be able to fill her life with enough hope, faith, and love, that, even when she's confronted with an image of evil, she'll know there's light in the darkness.
Between the unlimited exposure to technology and the often nonstop, overscheduled lives that so many children lead these days, there is little opportunity for them to ever experience anything that approximates a Zen-like mindfulness or calm.
Imagine your life without the latest technology. Imagine it without the Internet. Without a computer. Without a 4G Network. Without a smartphone. Would you be able to survive?
"The Perils of Texting While Parenting," by Ben Worthen Wall Street Journal, September 2012 "A Silicon Valley School The
Through the years I've found that trends can come from some unlikely sources. But never was I more surprised than when I discovered my (then) 8-year-old son would turn out to be a technology trendsetter.
Far from this being a world of digital natives, we live in a world where age compression on one end and longevity on the other have created -- for the first time that I know -- a continuum of purpose and value between the oldest and the youngest.