children's tv

There's good news, if you're lucky enough to get found and adopted. Kids engage more deeply than ever with favorite characters, stories and brands. They'll follow you across platforms, consume your content voraciously and share it with others.
Valuable lessons a few muppets can teach us later in life.
Hey, I'm Wishbone, the eponymous Jack Russell Terrier from the show, "Wishbone." I'm famous, but, just like you, I poop in the grass. I bark at strange objects. Just like you if you're a dog, I mean, because that's what I am.
Faced with various milestones, situations and challenges we can all relate to -- such as fear of failure, insecurities and wanting to belong -- each episode left the viewer with a clearly defined message or "takeaway" which, more often than not, came down to one simple principle: Always try to do the right thing.
It seems rather fitting that the birthday of the late Fred McFeely Rogers (1928-2003) -- the renowned, award-winning creator and host of the creative children's television series Mister Rogers' Neighborhood -- falls on the first day of Spring each year, March 20.
If we're going to wring our hands over whether today's kids are losing creativity, though, it only takes seeing the smiles and obvious pride on "MasterChef Junior" participants' faces to suggest that it's worth the attempt.
"All of us have to be able to pause and breathe and take stock before reacting. So with Cookie Monster, it is trying to not
If you've ever had a toddler who watches morning TV, you know the drill. It's likely that he or she wakes up asking begging
I'm concerned that the comic edge may obscure the truth: Big Bird is an avian proxy -- what Romney really proposes is to kill a golden goose. Crippling public broadcasting would result in devastating cultural and educational losses.
Mr. Rogers' legacy is about to be extended further with a new animated spin-off of "Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood," the Wrap reported