China silk road

The success of the new Silk Roads depends on delivering win-win scenarios.
The developing world is the new engine of growth that will drive shared prosperity in the future.
The current strategic mistrust between Delhi and Beijing will make it very difficult for Indian policymakers to accept the "One Belt, One Road" initiative in its present form.
Looking at the present day through the lens of the recent past provides food for thought, if not grounds for pessimism. Hope for what tomorrow will bring has evaporated in many places in the West. But it's still very much alive and well in the East, where the web of routes once known as the Silk Roads are now rising again.
While most countries welcome the Chinese investment and inclusion in Beijing's trading network, there is mounting concern as to whether it will actually be able to pull off such a large, complex undertaking. Shannon Tiezzi, managing editor of The Diplomat, has been following the development of the "One Belt, One Road initiative," particularly in Africa. She joins Eric & Cobus -- in the podcast above -- to discuss the global implications of OBOR and its impact in Africa.
The modern Silk Road's establishment will mark a step toward reinvigorating the ancient Chinese concept of tianxia, in which the Chinese emperor was considered the divinely appointed ruler of the entire known world.