CHIP

Marian Wright Edelman believes if you don’t like the way the world is, you change it.
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Turns out, many are still angry about the retailer's trans bathroom stance.
You can play games, surf the internet and do some serious work on CHIP, the world's first $9 computer
You can play games, surf the internet and do some serious work on CHIP, the worlds first $9 computer.
Why are we wasting time apportioning blame before the problem is fixed and the poor children and families of Flint have fresh, clean water to drink and cook with and bathe in?
The President's budget includes sound improvements to Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), including
We have a great opportunity to reach our community and encourage parents to enroll for coverage along with their children. Through these efforts, more Hispanic children will not only gain health coverage but a more equitable opportunity for success in school.
As open enrollment under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) gets underway, we know there are people eligible for coverage who remain uninsured and are looking for information and resources to understand their options and get covered.
Recently released data from the U.S. Census Bureau's Current Population Survey show the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is working and helping get people health coverage. This is a welcome stark contrast to new census data showing children remain our poorest age group and the younger they are the poorer they are.
In many corners we hear the same old exhortation that the way to fix poverty and anything else that ails Americans is for us to become a nation of Good Samaritans. But has giving a beggar a coin ever been as effective as creating an economy that provides him or her a good education and a job?
At a time when we should be celebrating Medicaid and CHIP successes, serious threats to Medicaid, CHIP and the ACA continue to surface in Congress. So, in addition to advocating for continuing improvements in children's health coverage, we must also play defense to protect the hard-earned gains made for children as well as adults.
It's always very challenging for a parent when their child has a serious health condition. It's even more challenging when their child has a serious condition but has no health insurance to cover the needed care and emergencies.
In the House and Senate budget proposals for fiscal year 2016, passed with only Republican votes at the end of March, there are big winners and big losers. The big winners are defense spending and contractors and very wealthy people and powerful special interests. The big losers are children, our poorest group in America, and struggling low- and middle-income families.
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) hinted Thursday that she expected the Senate to pass the bill before leaving
Created for Children Hundreds of advocacy groups and Democrats in Congress spoke out against the changes. For now, the GOP
Congress must stop playing politics with children and pass four more years of funding for CHIP and MIECHV as part of the "doc fix" package if millions of children are not to be left with uncertainty and at greater risk. We need to ensure our children are healthy, supported, and strong if they are going to be able to support our growing number of seniors in the future.
Healthy kids grow up to be healthy adults, and together build strong families and communities. Right now, Congress has a chance to put differences aside and extend funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) for four more years.