chivalry

"It was so cute. The whole place was cracking up when it happened."
21st century chivalry must recognize that being chivalrous doesn’t have to be about protecting, but supporting.
I do! I took ballet and hip hop for a couple of years when I was younger; after that I joined the boy band and became very
As I read them a few months ago, I savored each one... it was nice to see that even though in today's world we may often wonder if love like this still exists, the thing I learned is that the patterns of early relationships and blooming love are still the same.
We've all heard the expression "chivalry is dead." While I'm convinced true gentlemen are still out there (I happen to be married to one), I do wonder about the younger generation. Now that I'm raising a little boy, I think about the kind of man I want him to be.
Be aware of your privilege as a man and don't use it to be a coward or a sucker by saying and doing things to take advantage. Be understanding, LISTEN to others. In every interaction, be humble and gentle and sincere.
Of course chivalry is dead; it's an outdated code used by medieval knights, for crying out loud, not a modern day code on dating etiquette. Why is there so much pressure on men to be measured against an unattainable goal?
The women I am among, the ones who have assured themselves I'm not a voyeur, give me a great deal for credit for my photographic labor. I'm dedicated, I take lovely photos, I'm always around. It's a lot of work. I feel duty-bound to acknowledge that my motives are much more self-serving.
I believe these seemingly harmless social norms serve to send a mixed -- and ultimately harmful -- message to men. When it comes down to it, how can we as women demand equal wages when we also expect to be paid for?
Why do my coworkers and friends feel a desire or even an obligation to respect me more than someone I'm potentially going to share myself romantically with?
Did I indeed win the battle for the heart and soul of my amazing wife and beat the little tin man for her devotion and adoration -- not to mention quality time spent? Or did I lose ground?
I used to think that my mom made her stand when I was seven in order to teach me to be a gentleman, a concept laden with the trappings of chivalry, often landing at odds with the equality demanded by feminism. Now I realize that she was actually teaching me that it was my job to show respect, keep my head up and look at the world through the lens of others.
Everyone needs help sometimes -- I don't know a single person who has never needed anything from anyone. This doesn't make us a land of enablers. This doesn't make us weak. This doesn't make us co-dependent. This makes us human.
You trust in saving graces like this. You trust that one day soon, you'll be able to laugh about this -- life's tragedy and consequent comedy. Because, at nearly 31, all you can do is accept that this is the life you're living.
I don't want my love life to be transactional. I'm not dating to get free meals; I'm dating to find someone who I can commit to -- a partner and an equal. I don't need a man who showers me with meals and drinks; I need a man who showers me with thought-provoking conversation
Ed had been charming and chivalrous for as long as I had known him. One might have expected these qualities to disappear once he developed Alzheimer's, but the opposite occurred. He became even more charismatic than before.
Researchers found that male students who had just had the door opened for them felt less self-confident and had lower self