Christian nationalism

Hundreds of Christian leaders have signed a letter rejecting Christian nationalism and conspiracy theories.
Some Christian leaders have spoken out to denounce what they saw as the misuse of their faith to justify a violent attack.
There was a distinctly Christian nationalist presence at the U.S. Capitol riot. Some leaders are trying to publicly reject it -- but others are staying silent.
Their religion-centered, anti-Democrat, anti-science, anti-multicultural message mirrors the Christian nationalism seen at the U.S. Capitol riot.
Ralph Drollinger, who leads a Bible study for Trump's cabinet members, claims homosexuality, environmentalism and atheism are signs of God's wrath.
It's hard for gun control activists to find common ground with folks who believe the Second Amendment is a God-given right.
For atheists, humanists, Satanists and other secular folk, Christmas is a season for political activism.
Nationalism and patriotism aren't the same thing, says the Rev. William J. Barber II of North Carolina.
This could explain why some evangelicals are willing to overlook that Trump is not a choir boy.
The story we tell ourselves is that the American identity is rooted not in place, but in the acceptance of a common set of ideals, irrespective of race, religion or ethnicity. The politics of the last decade, however, have strained the notion of e pluribus unum, revealing among whites three definitions of the American nation that are exclusive rather than inclusive.