Meryl Streep can do anything. In her new movie, Florence Foster Jenkins, she is the title character, a real life self-created
In 1968, television network ABC was dead last in the ratings. So for the Democratic and Republican national conventions held in August, ABC hired political polar opposites conservative William F. Buckley Jr. and liberal Gore Vidal to provide commentary and debate each other.
On the high end, the weight of this problem is not heavy, particularly when production is responsive to workers' needs and safety; consumers do not buy as much as is needed to stay competitive in the "fast fashion" business model, where the poor are at risk of deplorable work conditions and low wages to keep churning out goods that no one really needs, and actually makes no one happy.
Missing from Monday's lunch at The Leopard, Meryl Streep, wicked as an ugly witch in Rob Marshall's movie adaptation of Stephen
It's easy to admire a lady on your TV screen, but asking someone to be a mentor can be pretty terrifying when you don't even have the guts to order a pizza without using an app.
In the days leading up to the Emmy Awards, gifting lounges around Los Angeles took over various hotels, enticing celebrities with the latest in electronics, beauty treatments, vacations and more.
Woody Allen is up to his old tricks. Real ones, like pulling a rabbit out of a hat. In previous films he's played the magician role himself, but in Magic in the Moonlight he allows the dreamy Colin Firth to handle the willing suspension of disbelief.
"The Good Wife" sneak peek of "A Precious Commodity."