Christopher Reeve

Clark's Botanicals' beauty product line was born out of tragedy when company founder Francesco Clark, who then worked at Harper's Bazaar, suffered a crippling spinal cord injury after diving into the shallow end of a swimming pool on June 1, 2002.
Superman has been played by 4 different actors over the past 65 years. See the evolution of Superman in feature film.
With the release of Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice mere days away, Brian and Zaki take a fond stroll down memory lane
On January 2, 1988, Alan T. Brown was on vacation in Martinique. He was just about to turn 21. The deep blue ocean beckoned and he dove into the surf. The next thing he knew the undertow pulled his legs out from under him and flipped him upside down onto the hard sand. He hit the ocean's floor head-first then heard a snap.
Alexandra Reeve Givens, the daughter of actor Christopher Reeve, has named her newborn son after her late father. She and
Robin Williams' son, Zak Williams, has opened up for the first time about his father's death. At the Christopher & Dana Reeve
On the ten year anniversary of Christopher Reeve's death, his son Matthew announces a "game changing" treatment that could help millions of people suffering from paralysis. Matthew Reeve joins us live.
"It was his old pal from acting school, Robin Williams," Walters reveals. "[Reeve] started to laugh." "I remember he told
The current trend of superhero/fantasy/sci-fi films can be seen as a form of modern mythology -- grand out-of-the-ordinary tales inspired by human experience like lore of old, with this newer crop of stories heavily influenced by big entertainment corporate interests.
With a character as iconic Superman, you've got to find a way to deal with what is essentially, an earnest American story that might seem a bit out of sync with where we are today.
How times have changed. Superman is no longer in the title. The campy mild-mannered reporter is nowhere to be found.
Zack Snyder widens his view as a director with Man of Steel, taking a proclivity for creating startling images in the service of storytelling and using it to enlarge and expand the action.
In today's movies, my reaction to seeing entire cities destroyed while superheroes fight is to shrug. That doesn't seem right. I feel that I should be offended, or at least disturbed -- but I've seen it so many times now that I just don't care. We've raised the stakes so high, they've effectively lost their meaning. How much more destruction can the next villain cause that this last one didn't? As an audience member trying to relate to what's happening onscreen, there's a point where I think, Dead is dead. How much more dead can I be?
To mark the release of this weekend's Man of Steel -- and against my better judgment -- I decided to re-watch Superman III for the first time since 1983 and hopefully not destroy a little piece of my childhood in the process. Along the way, I've committed to keeping a running diary. So here we go. (Sorry, childhood memories.)
Television shows and movies based on Superman have always reflected America's zeitgeist, but Man of Steel goes deeper into questioning America's identify by examining the values that Superman -- and thus, America -- was raised with.
To pass we need 54 votes, a 2/3 majority of the 80-member assembly. AD 1: Brian Dahle: assemblymember.dahle@assembly.ca.gov
Sometimes there is that movie that reaches out and grabs us and we may be ashamed when someone asks about your favorite movie. For me, that is the 1980 film Somewhere in Time: a romantic tale of time-crossed lovers. Now Ken Davenport is bringing that story to the stage as a musical.
I hope that my children and grandchildren find heroes -- of all kinds -- they can relate to (warts and all), but I also hope that they will be able to distinguish between them.
Superman III is an interesting movie. We had seen Superman battle Lex Luthor and General Zod, now he was gong head-to-head
The article was on the front page of the New York Times, chronicling the story of a young man with a stutter who was asked by his college professor not to participate in class discussion.