citizenfour

The most mesmerizing of the six rooms is dark, and empty except for a large, carpeted rectangle designed to be laid upon
Homeland Is Not a Series is a quick, interesting, quirky and insightful look at what has come to be known as "The Homeland Incident," showing now on Field of Vision.
I am honored to present exclusive audio of a Q&A with Citizenfour Director Laura Poitras, which took place as part of the Talking Pictures program at the 2015 Palm Springs International Film Festival.
I went to the 8:30 a.m. U.S. premiere of, "Bonobo,"a film co-written and directed by Matthew Hammett Knott. "Bonobo," was first released in the UK to great success, winning awards and was very well received.
UPDATE: The site previously hosting "Citizenfour" imported the film illegally. You can catch the movie in limited release
The host of the awards has no place contradicting the view of a documentary filmmaker who has just spoken eloquently of the subject of her film.
"Citizenfour" won Best Documentary at the Oscars on Sunday night. Director Laura Poitras accepted the award with Glenn Greenwald by her side. "The disclosures that Edward Snowden reveals don't only expose a threat to privacy but to democracy itself," she said "Thank you to Edward Snowden and to the many other whistleblowers."
Citizenfour chronicles the eight days Poitras, Glenn Greenwald and Ewan MacAllister of The Guardian spent with Edward Snowden in Hong Kong as he handed over classified documents providing evidence of mass indiscriminate and illegal invasions of privacy by the NSA.
Best Director Richard Linklater, "Boyhood" Best Non-Fiction Film (Documentary) "CITIZENFOUR" Best Cinematography Darius Khondji
There is a remarkable moment in the new Edward Snowden documentary Citizenfour that shows why we need judges to take their duty to uphold the Constitution seriously.
Laura Poitras' compelling, controversial, and ultimately contradictory new documentary Citizenfour, the filmmaker seems to have fallen in love with her "agent" -- in this case the movie's hero, or villain, depending upon how you look at it -- Edward Snowden.
Director Laura Poitras, like reporter Glenn Greenwald, is now known almost as widely as Edward Snowden himself, for helping facilitate his entry into the world. Her new film takes you back to June 2013 and locks you in that Hong Kong hotel room. It's a riveting, surprisingly unclaustrophic, and unforgettable experience.
Glenn Greenwald tells Snowden of a second person at the National Security Agency involved in leaking secrets.