city planning

This New Jersey neighborhood refuses to be overrun by Starbucks and CVS.
It's taken almost 60 years, but we are finally realizing the error we made when the United States built highways through the middle of its cities, displacing and isolating hundreds of thousands of residents, and we're beginning to do something about it.
In some areas of Vancouver, change feels like a developers' feast. Strangers with unsolicited offers to purchase appear at
Ultimately, planners and developers have to think not just about trade, but about people -- the people who will use the bridges
Making cities less dangerous and more livable for women actually makes them better for everyone.
On his first visit to the United States, Pope Francis curiously chose to spend his time in three of our largest cities--New York City, Philadelphia, and Washington D.C. As a Pope deeply concerned with social and economic inequality, perhaps this was no coincidence.
Perhaps most notable are London's iconic new skyscrapers popularly renamed for their shapes. The Shard is the Renzo Piano-designed 87-storey sheath piercing the sky. (And shattering sales records, reportedly, for its condominium apartments.)
The smart growth characteristics of these older neighborhoods make them terrific for the environment and for public health: they reduce transportation emissions by obviating driving trips and shortening those that people do take; they save land by keeping development compact and obviating additional increments of sprawl; they promote physical fitness and health with walkability.
How can cities rise to meet big new challenges -- and serve more and more people -- with resources that are always stretched thin? By finding smart ways to use a resource that is always growing: Data. And more and more cities are doing exactly that.
The city is a perpetually incomplete project; it is constantly being remade and reshaped by the changing state of our world, whether by the interventions of its governing bodies or the powerful actions of its residents. Architecture can and must speak to this adaptability, as both a technology and reflection of social change.
At its best, New York City is a place where people from all walks of life live together and interact with each other. But a new residential tower rising on Manhattan's west side tears at that tradition.
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The trash plan itself is already archaic. This particular part of it is a disaster. For reasons that no one quite understands, de Blasio has not yet sent it the way of stop and frisk, although he or the next mayor will eventually have to.
True, snow in Atlanta is a rare occurrence. Perhaps this isolated event exposes some fundamental flaws in how a quintessential American city operates.
So, what makes a street successful and how can understanding street design improve your daily life? Victor Dover and John
If New York is so happy with Bloomberg, why did it just elect someone who is his polar opposite, a tall lefty? The truth is that despite pumping his own money into the system, Bloomberg has done a merely adequate job.
These hyper-performing landscapes are tiny by park standards, but they bring beauty to formerly barren corners, serve as mini habitats for insects and birds, and most of all, soak up storm water.