Clark Gable

The footage that never made it into the final cut of "The Misfits" has been locked in a cabinet since 1999.
And speaking of animated classics, out ahead of the March 4th release of Zootopia, the El Capitan recently held a week-long
A quick-witted Colbert, who starred in more than 60 movies and many Broadway plays, held her own opposite Clark Gable, Maurice Chevalier, Gary Cooper, Joseph Cotten, Melvyn Douglas, Henry Fonda, Fredric March, Ray Milland, Spencer Tracy, John Wayne, Orson Welles, Rex Harrison and other leading men.
2. Malcolm McDowell/Alex--A Clockwork Orange Stanley Kubrick's dystopian sci-fi allegory is one of cinema's great dark satires
Forget local history books that don't fully account for a civil war and other setbacks that ruined the country and follow the money in Lebanon's tortuous slide from "Switzerland of the Middle East" to dysfunctional entity par excellence.
Jane Wyman was Ronald Reagan's first wife. They met when they were both working their way up the Hollywood star ladder -- Wyman was actually ahead of Reagan -- and they came out of the same background: hardscrabble Depression; very much hand-to-mouth.
Hollywood, like any place that is more about its lore than the actual sum of its parts, is full of unsung heroes who have given audiences some of their most cherished cinematic moments.
Please Insult Me, Don RicklesThe stars came out Saturday night in Los Angeles -- not for another superfluous awards ceremony, but rather to watch a comic icon perform. "Mr. Warmth," Don Rickles, played the Saban Theatre in Beverly Hills
The socialites warmly welcomed the war hero; in turn, he found solace in a milieu antithetical to the hell of war.
Just when I thought I could answer any trivia question on David O. Selznick's 1939 production of Gone with the Wind, comes a treasure of new material in Steve Wilson's book, The Making of Gone with the Wind.
Anna Godbersen is the bestselling author of The Luxe series and Bright Young Things. Her new novel, The Blonde, is her first foray into adult fiction and is a compulsively gripping read.
An awkwardly insecure girl from the tenements of New York is forced, by societal conditions and a lack of viable options, into marriage to her boss; motherhood; and such continued repression that she finally takes matters into her own hands--mighty pretty hands, all the men tell her--and brutally murders her husband.
It's often cliché to speak of being "whisked away," but quite honestly when you enter that's exactly what will happen. Were it not for the few slot machines to your left and electric lights throughout, you'd swear you stepped back to 1913.
It's Thursday, and that means it's time to throw it back. We check out the timeless style of 1950s leading women, track Will Smith's transition from a Fresh Prince to a fashionable father, learn interior decorating from Frasier Crane and much more!
With apologies to Nathaniel Hawthorne, who is dead and can't sue me, I live in the House of the Three Gables. When the vent in the main one, the Clark gable, was gone with the wind after a recent storm, my wife, Sue, asked me to fix it.
In 2011, the grandson of the Hollywood legend, Clark Gable III, then 22, was charged with a felony for pointing a laser at
Going all the way back to Homer's Odyssey, some of our finest stories take place on voyages or quests of some kind, where our hero (or heroine) not only experiences new sights and adventures, but also some transformation in thinking, circumstance, or attitude as a result. The road movie is the cinematic equivalent.
You might think anyone who’s made it into a major movie – as an actor, director, producer, costume designer or in any other
With her megawatt smile and porcelain skin, Lana Turner's look was interesting enough for her to get discovered while skipping
When I recall the things I admired most about Robert F. Kennedy -- his fire, his faith, his Quixote-like tilt against racial injustice -- I'm reminded that it's hard to find heroes like that anymore, especially during an election season.