clash of civilizations

With our former hegemons in precipitous decline I am often reminded of Aesop's inquisitive fox, who visits an old lion one day as he lies enfeebled amidst the cold shadows of his cave. Presumably the story had as much to say to us in the early 1900s with the slow shrinking of the Pax Britannica as it does today as our vexed Pax Americana gradually hits the dust.
I was listening to a German parliamentarian the other night. She was making some anodyne comments about transatlantic friendship
We like to live our lives, go to bars, go to football games and concerts. We believe -- and rightly so -- that we have the right to live our lives in this way. Only, through the actions of our nations, we make it impossible for many other people to live their lives in the same way.
What makes the Republicans discourse' on Islam and the Muslim world dangerous is that it is disseminated through a wide and powerful network of media outlets and rightwing think tanks then consumed by a public with no direct contact or firsthand knowledge of the Muslim world.
PARIS -- Islamophobia is not a new phenomenon, suddenly uncovered by social media on the Internet. Islamophobia is as old as Islam itself. Yet, Islam can be rightly credited as a trendsetter in interfaith harmony. We all need to articulate that for the sake of humanity.
Mid-late 1960s: West goes East. While it was John Lennon, Yoko Ono and Canada that initiated Rock n' Roll Diplomacy, George Harrison was the first to apply that concept to music.
ISTANBUL -- In his seminal 1996 volume, The Clash of Civilizations, Samuel Huntington described Turkey as a "torn country." According to Huntington, despite its adoption of Western institutions such as democracy and the rule of law, Turkey remains firmly rooted in the culture of the Islamic world and is therefore experiencing a "civilizational crisis." Today, Turkey is still the only secular, democratic republic in the Islamic world; sadly, under Erdoğan's increasingly Islamist rule, it is proving Huntington right with every passing day.
So what is the wound of the people? There is no simple answer, but we are beginning to understand that this is the all-important question because it leads us to engage the conflicts from which we must not shy away and it prevents us from engaging in false ones.
As a Christian standing in what had once been a magnificent church, I could not feel the holiness of those huge disks. I felt bullied by them.
If I'm not on one side, this doesn't mean that I'm with the other. I'm neither on the side of those media that insult my faith and beliefs and spread lies, nor the side of violent criminals who insult my faith and beliefs, and spread lies.
A Turkish newspaper which reproduced part of the magazine is currently being investigated by prosecutors. Speaking at a businessmen's
We seem to be prisoners of a terrible choice today: either the uncontrollable nationalisms of the humiliated striking back or the violent struggles of communities to assert their identities. At such a moment, we need to support artists that can be bridges between cultures. We need to support the work of spreading ideas and building a new common history. Only then can we avoid falling into the abyss of a clash of identities or succumb to the passions of nationalism.
We are all loitering in our classroom one lunchtime. Barry Sutton suddenly asks me a question: ''Hey, Imran! Are your parents going to arrange your marriage?'' Everyone's attention is suddenly upon me.
In the last 12 years since the 9/11 attacks, familiarity has led to a better Western understanding of the complexities in the Muslim world, while far-reaching changes in the Muslim world have undermined a black and white view of the region in the West.
There is only one civilisation in place today, one that has evolved and developed over hundreds of years, and in which Muslims
In an incredibly influential essay published 20 years ago in Foreign Affairs, the late Samuel P. Huntington first outlined his clash of civilizations theory, which he later elaborated on and fleshed out in a book published in 1996.
As a Christian American studying international law half way across the world in Turkey, I'm constantly confronted with the question of Huntington's "Clash of Civilizations." But in this era, Turkey doesn't have to abandon Islam to progress as a democracy and realize human rights.
Targeted killing by drone has proven to be tactically effective but, as evidenced in Vietnam, overwhelming success at the tactical level does not necessarily translate into success at the strategic level.
The common observation is that the Chinese know much more about us than we know about them.