cliches

Speed fascinates us all. It is the rare contest that rewards the slowest. Our language reflects this fixation on the fastest. Vivid figures of speech attempt to impress upon the listener just how quickly something happens.
If I am feeling a little full of myself, I might call myself "original." But this is inaccurate. Life itself is ceaselessly, relentlessly original. When I'm stuck on a description, it is only because I am resisting this originality.
Candidates often feel like they are under scrutiny from potential employers -- that is because they are. Their qualifications and experience are on display with each resume they send out. And they are lucky if those qualifications actually get reviewed by a hiring manager.
I am about to commit a sin of epic proportions. What I am about to say will certainly outcast me, and could very well land me in prison...or, at a minimum, on the black list of every child born between the years 2005 and 2012.
My friend James has sculpted a big glorious life out of clay mixed of abundance and brilliance. He buys, grows, sells, creates and sculpts companies. He grows people too. He teaches them how to be better versions of themselves, with his wisdom.
Even the sharpest teenage minds frequently gravitate towards college essay topics that are so common that they can only be described as clichés: stories and messages that every adult has already heard and, probably, already lived through.
With each passing year, I become more aware that simple clichés -- the ones I never really paused to ponder before -- exist because of their timeless truth. And if you embrace and reflect on the words you once considered trite, you will be amazed at the guidance and hope they can offer.
I REMEMBER SOME STUFF THAT HAPPENED BEFORE As Hillary Clinton prepares to end months of speculation, a new mystery is emerging
Ladies and gentlemen (or to avoid being gender-specific) members of The American Copy-Editors and Fact-Checkers Guild: It is my pleasure to welcome each one of you and, of course, "you" in the plural sense, to this evening's Hall of Fame Banquet.
27) readymade I know I am not going to get my wish on this, but I think it's time we put to bed the entire industry of art
6. "Young lady." Not only is this patronizing and condescending, it gives us flashbacks of being in trouble with our parents
Nearly every major city hosts a neighborhood where occupants are just a little too cool for their own good, and it's important to identify the key characteristics of such "freethinking" areas.
By Science of Us Follow @thescienceofus Smelling a fishy odor is enough to induce suspicion in people, and people primed
Ice cream sandwiches are on so many fine dining restaurant dessert menus right now it makes me want to puke. No ice cream sandwich is worth $9. None.
Here are nine hackneyed social observations you can test yourself against in order to determine if you're a witty social guru or merely a repetitive buffoon.
I want to be in New York because it is a city of brilliance. The city is bursting with inimitable musicians and engineers and journalists and politicians who defy all preconceived notions of what it means to be "intelligent."
It took me a while to understand Rita's parenting style, and even longer to appreciate it. But now, I like to think about her style as an important balance to my mother's - a ying to her yang, if you will.
"I've got a case of the Mondays." Who wouldn't, after Sunday funday? What makes a phrase cringe-worthy? "Give 110 percent