climate denial

Despite overwhelming proof, President Trump and his administration keep downplaying climate change.
Scientists must develop strategies to counter a current flood of deception and misinformation.
As we watch Donald Trump take on the most powerful position in the world, many of us are left asking how a man who has consistently lied to his public could get so far.
I spoke with Sheats by telephone, and we discussed her trajectory to becoming an elected representative of the people. Currently
We humans passionately hold on to our beliefs even when confronted with compelling scientific evidence that we are dead wrong.
"I've been told by some of the staff it's been useful to them," White told SNL Energy Finance Daily in a recent interview
“This election may be a tipping point in the climate debate,” said John Coleman.
Exxon’s executives and their allies robbed us of a generation’s worth of action on climate.
All In With Chris Hayes (MSNBC) hosted a series looking at how climate change is impacting Americans from Alaska to Florida. Hayes has consistently been on the cutting-edge of bringing environmental stories to his audience.
Several weeks ago, on June 17, I provided testimony about the threat of human-caused climate change to the Democratic Party Platform drafting committee in Phoenix Arizona. Fittingly, my testimony was just one day before record heat struck Phoenix.
A little-known fact, however, is that while ExxonMobil was misleading the public about climate disruption, it was also using trade rules to increase its power, to bolster its profits, and to actively hamper climate action.
Free Speech Attack? Related Reading: "There is no doubt": Exxon Knew CO2 Pollution Was A Global Threat By Late 1970s While
In Washington D.C. last week, a former Army general told a Senate committee that the U.S. military is being distracted and soldiers are being put at risk because the Department of Defense (DoD) has become "an unwitting agent for propagandizing the dangers of climate change."
As the ranking member of the House Committee on Natural Resources, Rep. Raúl Grijalva's work on issues such as environmental justice (EJ), climate change and the protection of our special places has set a very high standard for the rest of his colleagues on Capitol Hill.
Caught in the crosshairs of an ongoing New York Attorney General investigation exploring its role in studying the damage climate change could cause since the 1970's and then proceeding to fund climate science denial campaigns, ExxonMobil has announced an interesting job opening.
Many would argue, though, that in order for our monkey-brained congressional leaders (no offense to monkeys) to agree to a level playing field on climate with other world powers, we must first see the demand from voters within. This is precisely where #BlueMarbleLove is meant to act as our call to arms to the American public to show that we stand aligned on the need to address climate change.
At a time when science often seems to be on the defensive - from the safety of vaccines and genetically modified organisms to the very existence of evolution and climate change - I have found a hopeful sign. On Mars.
Fang's piece disclosed a June 2015 email signed by Alpha's CEO, Kevin Crutchfield, along with the CEOs of other coal companies, suggesting, at least, that the companies were all paying Horner, and for work aimed at engaging with the public.