climate negotiations

First thing Friday, while collecting the latest iteration of the text from the printers, I stumbled on a Chinese negotiator
Developing countries lose more and are damaged more. This is why developing countries have been continuously, tirelessly fighting for loss and damage in the climate negotiations. Meanwhile, developed countries like the United States, those who have caused the climate change we know today, have only evaded the topic.
The administration acknowledged that the outcome they are fighting for "is not guaranteed."
Encouraged by legislative and administrative victories in rolling back greenhouse gas emissions in California and by a sense that the climate protection movement is gaining momentum, activists are upbeat in advance of the forthcoming Paris climate talks this December.
A protest happened early Wednesday morning, the third day of the climate negotiations in Bonn, after civil society faced a lock out from the climate negotiations on Tuesday. Protesters were blindfolded holding letters that spelled out #KeepUsInTheRoom as negotiators and delegates went inside the conference center.
The U.S.-China accord has glaring shortcomings that illustrate the perils of voluntary pledges, each nation operating in its own autonomous emissions bubble and on its own schedule, impervious to any absolute global emission and temperature limit.
Global GHG emissions are rising ever more rapidly today, and carbon dioxide concentrations are already at their highest levels in millions of years, far above any ever encountered in human history.
The turbulent UN global climate talks that ended last December 14th in Lima, Peru without setting firm global GHG emissions limitations left the future of the world's climate in limbo.
Millions more who become sick with perfectly treatable conditions have no hope of recovery because their hospitals don't have access to electricity. There are no incubators, no life-saving equipment and no refrigeration to store essential vaccines.
WASHINGTON –- President Barack Obama will pledge $3 billion this weekend to an international fund that helps developing countries