climbing

Climber Rick Weber has built a replica wall for a competition in Kentucky this month.
A raccoon climbed to the top of a skyscraper in Minnesota and became an internet sensation overnight.
Whether we are humbled by a bug or by a mountain, these travel lessons apply equally to all of life's challenges.
Huge money, huge audiences, huge stakes. Climbing -- originally a domain of the white, upper class and heterosexual men -- is an increasingly egalitarian community, but outside pressures are likely to obliterate the push.
You recently were preparing for a big climb in Patagonia but didn't make it down to South America. What happened? What are
The International Olympics Committee is looking to modernize the 2020 Games.
Is it really that life-changing (should you survive) to stand on top of the Earth's highest point? Is it worth the risk? Perhaps, but I still don't think I'll ever understand the compulsion.
Also on HuffPost: The Cingino Dam is actually a bit easier for the Alpine ibex to climb than other constructed dams because
Mission Memorial Day is a commitment, a commitment that myself and three other combat vets made to ensure that our friends we lost overseas, and so many other young Americans would be remembered.
I've got big news for all you serious outdoor types: Maine's Katahdin isn't the climbing adventure you thought it was. Mt. Mansfield? Mt. Washington? These nubs are a walk in the park.
We are raising children in an age where there seems to be more worry and fear about everything, and less ability to persevere and cope in the face of adversity. Our modern day technological culture promotes doing things easier and quickly. Exerting the least amount of effort for the greatest impact and reward seems to be most valued.
There is that moment when the indigo sky pales and the stars slowly vanish, yet the sun is still hidden. What time is it? You can't guess. You are near the top of an all night hike - one way, uphill - to the roof of Africa.
(Caters News) If you thought climbing the corporate ladder was a hair-raising experience, Andrej Ciesielski's extremely dangerous
One would think that a tragic event such as the one I experienced last year would deter or frighten me, but it had just the opposite effect. When I got home, I promised myself that I would return in 2015 to climb Mt. Everest.
In last few months, I've read and heard accomplished mountaineers and successful entrepreneurs talk about how mountain climbing lessons can be applied to business. Issues such as teamwork, risk management, overcoming obstacles, and addressing failures were common themes amongst these articles and talks.
Staff Sergeant Charlie Linville, a Marine Corps veteran who lost his lower right leg during his service, has spent years
READ MORE AT ALASKA DISPATCH NEWS A solo summit this time of year is a real "sufferfest," as Talkeetna climber Willi Prittie