cluster bombs

Both before and during the aerial bombardment of Taleban strongholds, I conducted phone interviews in Dari with fixed line
From 1964 to 1973, U.S. warplanes dropped more than 270 million cluster munitions on the communist country, one-third of which did not explode.
"Since Russia and Syria have renewed their joint air operations, we have seen a relentless use of cluster munitions."
There is no excuse to prioritize profit over human rights. Senator Jack Reed and the rest of Congress have made themselves fully complicit in Saudi Arabia's war crimes and the destabilization of Yemen.
President Obama is meeting Friday with Saudi Arabia's Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman with the conflict in Yemen among the topics of discussion. The President should take a signal from the House vote, and pressure Saudi Arabia to end its war in Yemen.
Hundreds of unexploded cluster bombs dropped by Syrian government forces in and around Eastern Ghouta since 2012 pose a deadly
A number of readers have written inquiring where cluster bombs can be conveniently purchased. At first blush one might think that the question is being asked by readers who are tired of the limited ability of the AK 47 to inflict harm on a lot of people in a short amount of time, that weapon being a favorite of those who do mass murders.
After almost a year of civil war, the conflicting forces in Yemen sat down on December 15 in Geneva, Switzerland, to discuss the prospect of finding a political solution to the conflict that has been raging since March 2015.
The U.S. is not a party to the international Convention on Cluster Munitions. But its reluctance to press Saudi Arabia on cluster munition use in Yemen appears to be having an impact on three close allies who are parties to that treaty.
This week campaigners against cluster munitions are pressing for answers on why any financial institution or bank would choose to be associated with the production of this banned weapon. PAX, a member of the international Cluster Munition Coalition, has released a report revealing the financial institutions backing companies involved in production of cluster munitions.
The rising toll of civilian casualties in Syria is an ongoing reminder that use of cluster munitions, like chemical weapons and others that affect civilians, is not acceptable by anyone, anywhere or at any time.
Thank heaven that there are additional intense conversations happening beyond the U.S. Senate hearing -- and in other parts of the world -- or one may have walked away thinking that there were only TWO options regarding the Syria crisis: "strike" or "no strike.
While we debate our nation's role as the enforcers of the proper morality of war and weapons of mass destruction, it might serve us to remember that our commitments - and lack of commitments - to global peace greatly help shape our image and standing in the world.
It is legalistic hair-splitting to condemn the use of chemical weapons in Syria while turning a blind eye to the deliberate and sustained targeting of unarmed civilians in Sudan.
The United States and the international community have failed to take constructive steps to promote peace-making efforts, which could have brought the crisis in Syria to an end.
A cynic might say: What's the point of asking President Obama for clemency, when he's in charge of the system that put Manning in prison? President Obama is indeed in charge of the system that put Manning in prison. That's why he's the correct address for the appeal for clemency.
The horror of Boston should be a reminder that the choice of weaponry can be in itself an act of evil. President Obama made clear that "any time bombs are used to target innocent civilians, it is an act of terror." But are we as a society prepared to be judged by that standard?