coal ash

The Trump administration recently rolled back coal dump regulations.
We all know that North Carolina's Gov. Pat McCrory hastily signed HB2 only to acknowledge that pre-existing state law discrimination
The Commission concluded that the first-ever coal ash regulation could, in some ways, have an adverse impact on communities
George Jones is still serving his country. Navy vet (Korea) and lifetime resident of Virginia, Mr. Jones bused to Richmond to take his message of American responsibility to the governor. That message: no new pipelines, no more fracking, enough already with our dependence on fossil fuels.
The problem of low-income and minority communities being disproportionately exposed to chemicals, hazardous waste, and toxic
After a billion-gallon spill of coal ash in Tennessee, the agency sought to regulate the often-toxic byproduct of burning coal. It largely failed.
IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: Trump promises to toss historic UN climate agreement; Native American tribes halt massive coal export
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Coal ash contains known carcinogens such as arsenic, lead and mercury. This is why the EPA is now regulating coal ash. As power companies shut down or upgrade their facilities, the need to permanently dispose of this hazardous byproduct is growing. So far, these companies have dumped millions of tons of coal ash into unlined landfills across America -- putting our water supply at risk.
As a registered Republican who voted for McCrory in 2012, Deb thought her governor would be willing to help clean up the coal ash pollution she believes contributed to her husband's early death. But after her repeated attempts to contact the governor's office were ignored, Deb is starting to regret helping McCrory become governor.
It's clear that when corporate dollars pervade the government systems built to protect the public, we can no longer count on government to do its job and look after its most vulnerable communities.
The putrid smell emanating from the mountain of coal ash nauseates her. "It suffocates me to look at it," she told the commission
If you're a parent like me who loves to watch your child play in the local stream or lake, this information is infuriating and scary. The same goes if you're a wildlife lover, or some who just enjoys the outdoors and believes our waterways should remain safe and healthy.
This week, I want to honor some of the most hard-working activists on our Beyond Coal campaign -- Team Asheville in North Carolina. After years of rallies, public meetings, educational forums, leadership from the Asheville City council, letter-writing and even a visit from the TV star Ian Somerhalder on Tuesday, all that hard work paid off.
Since 2008, three major coal ash disasters have threatened lives, livelihoods and water quality in Virginia, Wisconsin, North Carolina and Tennessee, including the largest toxic waste spill in U.S. history. Communities across our country near leaking coal ash ponds and landfills can wait no longer.
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* Says could reach settlement in "next several days" The company, which sells power to 7.2 million customers in North Carolina