coal exports

Isn't it absurd that, as the fossil fuel era comes to a close and one of the world's largest coal companies stares down the barrel of bankruptcy, the New South Wales (NSW) Government introduces draconian laws which could send everyday people to jail for peacefully protesting?
Environmental advocates said they hope other parts of the country, and the world, might take lessons from Seattle, where
I was honored and inspired to stand with nine tribal nations from the Pacific Northwest as they came together in Seattle to sign a declaration urging the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to deny a permit for North America's largest coal export terminal, the proposed Gateway Pacific Terminal in the Salish Sea.
Bill sponsor U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) and supporter U.S. Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND) both stood on the Senate floor and said Keystone XL is not an export pipeline in the minutes leading up to the bill's failure.
If constructed, the facility could see some six to eight million tons of coal and refinery waste exported overseas every year (that's about six coal-fired power plants worth of coal).
"We are particularly concerned with the health of our most vulnerable populations: prenatal, early childhood, the elderly
"Leasing Coal, Fueling Climate Change: How the federal coal leasing program undermines President Obama's Climate Plan" tackles the dark underbelly of a rule that only polices coal downstream at the power plant level and largely ignores the upstream and global impacts of coal production at-large.
As U.S. companies eagerly eye the global coal market, especially China, what has happened to Indonesia's economy should be a cautionary tale. Coal has done little to improve the livelihoods of the communities where it operates.
BNSF has testified that up to 645 pounds of coal dust can escape from each rail car during a 400-mile journey, but Wallace