coasts

Millions of Americans visit our nation's sandy shores every year to relax, socialize, swim, paddle, or simply enjoy the view. Our nation's beaches are also major drivers of our coastal economies. From the coast of Maine to the shores of Hawaii, beaches attract an endless stream of visitors who patronize local hotels and businesses. According to the National Ocean Economics Program, ocean tourism and recreation contributes over $100 billion to our GDP every year.
Nearly 40% of U.S. citizens live in Coastal Shoreline Counties, but climate change might just evict every single one of them.
"I never would mess around with peoples' emotions and put music out that didn't mean everything to me. It's just not what I do. I can't make records quickly. I can't do stripped down live shows. I'm all in on everything."
On the last EcoWatch report card our oceans received a "D" grade. This grade is based on factors including pollution, overfishing and the impacts of climate change, biodiversity, carbon storage, coastal protection, clean waters, natural products, coastal livelihoods, economies, tourism and recreation.
Apparently, scientific information, no matter how solid, is unable to persuade a good many people of the reality of climate change. At the same time we're finding that less objective (and less scientifically valid) types of information can affect people's views.
It seems fairly certain that as long as we gulp down barrels and barrels of oil each day, we are going to have pipelines and pipeline spills. There is a solution, admittedly not an easy one: get off the gasoline kick.
There have been lots of favorable comments like this one from Assemblyman Joe Borelli (R-South Shore): "I was extremely impressed
North Carolina's now infamous bill, House Bill 819 -- designed to outlaw accelerated rates of sea-level rise in North Carolina has hit a snag... at least for now.
With memories of the catastrophic hurricane seasons of 2004, 2005 and 2008 (the three most costly on record) still fresh, the predictions for an average season are quite welcome. But two recent publications suggest that we are far from being in the clear when it comes to hurricanes.
The proposed legislation would create a funding process based on interest from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund, 12.5 percent