cocoa

Higher temperatures and low humidity could harm cocoa production in the Ivory Coast and Ghana, which produce 50% of the world’s cocoa.
Here are a few tips for chocolate lovers who want to stay healthy while they indulge on dessert.
Poverty and extreme poverty in many cases are the consequence of exploitative business models of multinational corporations that claim to be ethical and also say that they support the SDGs.
"They're doing quite well, given the circumstances," said Emilio Huertas, LWR's Colombia country director. Those conditions
I look forward to your comments or questions and to your 10CentsPerCup. We must have the courage to tell the truth to our
Benedicto H. Ntibikema, Rural Community Adaptation to Climate Change, Kasulu, Tanzania. Trainings in sustainable farming
But it is difficult to question the merit and success of the Fairtrade and certified coffee, chai and cacao marketing campaigns
The bean to bar experience actually starts with a pod.
My favorite chocolate indulgence is a combination of half an ounce of 90 percent single-source organic dark chocolate with
Using REDD finance, the REDD+ Secretariat will recruit and deploy agronomical experts, who will educate and advise farmers
Chocolate producers, cocoa buyers and local governments are all more successful if the cocoa farmer is successful, which is why increased collaboration and cooperation between groups, even competitors, is imperative.
Claudio Corallo has 40 years of experience producing coffee and chocolate in Africa, working first in Zaire (today the Democratic Republic of Congo) and since the 1990s in São Tomé and Príncipe, a tiny archipelago off the coast of Guinea in West Africa. When he started out, his greatest challenge was removing the characteristic bitterness of the variety of beans grown on his plantation. Today, he sells his dark chocolate to gourmet buyers in Europe, the United States and Japan.
The systemically low prices in cocoa have drastic consequences for farmers and their families. More than 2 million children in the Ivory Coast and Ghana are being deprived of their childhoods, either working in extremely hazardous conditions or working in lieu of going to school, so that we can get our chocolate fix.
Much has been written in response to the Mast Brothers scandal (or what our team refers to as "Mast-gate"). Nearly every perspective, rebuttal, or defense has been shared, so much so that I debated whether to publish this post, concerned I'd be adding to the noise. But there's one perspective that's missing and it's that of a (fellow?) chocolate maker.
Through their assertions, Mast Brothers make it much harder for chocolate makers who do actual good works to flourish. And it makes it harder for us to do the work we want to do in supporting quality chocolate and makers with integrity.