cognitive bias

By Tom Mihaljevic, president and CEO of Cleveland Clinic Most corporate vision statements include the word commitment. But
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Implicit bias is an everyone problem, because it is a brain problem. And it was brave to address that problem, as politicians rarely tell us things that make us uncomfortable.
How candidates say things matters just as much as whether they stuck to the facts.
During a normal election year, you can set your watch based on the following stages of bias overwhelming the ability to think critically.
There are well-documented reasons that we humans are fearful of the wrong things (from an odds perspective).
The vast majority of prosecutors are true professionals, keenly aware of their immense power and its consequent responsibility. They form accurate conclusions on guilt far more often than the converse. Still, cognitive bias and overconfidence touch us all.
I suspect that the reason formal logic and rhetoric aren't highlighted when critical thinking is brought up as our most vital
Here's the myth. The idea that successful people are somehow different from other people.
What sets resilient people apart from those who give up more easily? The ability to manage and master their explanatory styles post situations, both personal and professional.
Given how much coverage of the Pulse story has centered on what the candidates did and didn't say afterwards, clearly stories about domestic Presidential politics have taken precedence over stories related to the event itself (apart from stories of people dealing with personal tragedies, which have fortunately not been used to fuel partisan arguments - yet).
Almost by definition, the most important and innovative scientific findings often go against people's existing beliefs. If
This isn't going to be easy to hear, but someone you trust is leading you astray in your quest for fantasy baseball glory. Don't look now, but it's that big ol' brain of yours. In a horrible stroke of luck, it's hardwired for survival and not for winning fantasy leagues.
Most of us probably expected an election similar to ones we've experienced in the past: a rowdy primary that finally settles down to each party picking a Senator or Governor (maybe a Congressman) whom the parties could rally around before going into battle in the Fall.
The way visual information gets processed by our brain presents challenges with regard to thinking critically. In some cases
These days, we are bombarded daily on social media with political memes and articles that aren't exactly accurate, to say the least. It seems impossible at times to sort fact from fiction, and news from propaganda. So how do you keep yourself from drowning in a sea of misinformation?
I want to be vocal about my experience in order to encourage others to do the same. The experience is one that needs to be collectively shared so that future generations will one day feel empowered and thus embrace their culture.
We are both members of The Esquire Network (TEN) and he has been mentioning that we seem to have very similar approaches to the practice of law and suggesting that we should discuss it further over breakfast. We did just that.
The very wealthy are disproportionately opposed to any policy -- including tax policies -- that would redistribute wealth more equitably. This makes sense from a purely economic perspective. But is there more to it than rational self-interest?