Colette

Three years after writer and director Richard Glatzer died of ALS complications, his widower and collaborator Wash Westmoreland is releasing their final film.
Fast forward about 3,000 years to Israel Horovitz' play Out of the Mouths of Babes. In this striking Cherry Lane Theatre production (www.cherrylanetheatre.org), the Babes are adults. Out of their mouths comes wit..with claws. Picture four sassy, savvy, snarky babes -- all ex-wives and lovers of the same beloved Professor -- clumped together in one Paris apartment for his funeral.
What makes a show fail? Many in the industry have pondered that question. If we knew the answer, shows wouldn't fail. Even veteran producers with a string of hits sometimes stumble. For there is really no magic key.
This endlessly-copied artist knows no bounds of time or space. Colette was born in North Africa to mixed ancestry, raised in France and has been characterized by social gadfly Anthony Haden-Guest as "a gauze-draped pillar of the New York art world."
It is drizzling. Of course it is. The damp air smells of metro fumes and a hint of Terre d'Hermès as I painfully drag my suitcase up the stairs and onto le boulevard Saint Michel. I look around. Red lipstick stands out against the gray sky.
Don't get me wrong, there's no problem with being a sex worker, or a wife, or a ballerina, or a heiress if you so choose. But what the female protagonists and antagonists in Gigi and An American in Paris lack is agency in their happily ever afters.
The reference to the release from Arthur Freed's incomparable MGM unit is recorded here as preamble to the unhappy news that a woefully cheap travesty of the gloriously romantic film has now opened at the Neil Simon.
Hedi Slimane has had his share of battles with fashion critics and magazine editors during his first year as the designer
This unique collaboration, remarkable in the unbarred intensity burning through the screen, would seem to resolve, for once
Many of us are heading back to work or school. Sort of puts one in a snappish mood, doesn't it? This time of year, novel readers can viscerally relate to fictional characters who are snarky, snippy, and smart-alecky, to quote a recently accessed thesaurus.