Colin Quinn

"The sorority girl came up to me afterward and said, 'We're not paying you.'"
Sherlock Holmes once said: "You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear." Colin Quinn not only observes people and their cultural idiosyncrasies, he describes them with remarkably keen wit and empathy in his hilarious new one-man show.
What nicely distinguishes Quinn, who's the son of two teachers, is his broad knowledge of history and his consequent amusement at riffing on it. If he's intent on reducing it, stand-up-comic-like, to stereotypes, I suppose that's his business -- and a remunerative one at that.
This comedy is often so deliriously entertaining and so deftly constructed, you won't realize for a time that one of America's favorite, new, politically astute comics is having her values derailed.
I had the opportunity to talk to this amazing cross-section of modern comedy on their swing through San Francisco, and what follows are edited highlights from several roundtable discussions.
"This is the best night of my life," Amy Schumer addressed the exuberant crowd at Alice Tully Hall on Tuesday for the world premiere of her romantic comedy, Trainwreck. Director Judd Apatow stood nearby feeding the comedienne lines, reminding her to thank Universal and the Film Society of Lincoln Center, hosts of the spectacular launch, including the lavish after party at the refurbished Tavern on the Green.
To my mind, Trainwreck is both a very funny movie -- and yet another example of Apatow's inability to edit himself. Like every movie he's made, this one has several big laughs -- and could easily be 20 minutes shorter. 
The MovieFilm gang starts out this week's show by welcoming celebrated author and pop culture historian Caseen Gaines to help celebrate thirty years of Back to the Future, and talk up his new must-read tome We Don't Need Roads: The Making of the Back to the Future Trilogy.