Collateral Damage

Afghan forces and their allies were responsible for more than half of all civilian deaths in the first three months of 2019.
Too bad we can't ask 8-year-old Nawar al-Awlaki for her opinion on whose killings are worse, America's or Russia's. She apparently
  The assassination of John F. Kennedy managed to be both the crime of the century and a typical act of gun violence. The
Kathy Kelly (kathy@vcnv.org) co-coordinates Voices for Creative Nonviolence (www.vcnv.org). Two major news stories here in
More than three years after President Barack Obama pledged to be transparent about the United States' lethal drone program, his administration has finally come forward with an accounting of the numbers of civilian deaths that resulted from drone strikes between Jan. 20, 2009, and Dec. 31, 2015.
Resources and assistance are crucial for refugees hoping to create a new life. What is also necessary for these individuals, especially children, is a sense of normalcy and an outlet to express themselves.
Unlike some cultural aspects that are relative, violations of innocent people's physical integrity - such as dropping bombs on them - is universally deviant.
But as a former defense attorney, Hillary knows better. She knows there's no consistent way to reserve executions for just
Flattening Beirut has been done before. Flattening Gaza has been done before. And both may be done again if Israel's license to kill with impunity is left unchecked.
While many factors can affect a candidate's polling numbers, one uncomfortable conclusion can't be overlooked when it comes to reactions to Cruz's "carpet-bombing" comments: by and large, Americans don't think or care much about the real-world consequences of the unleashing of American air power.
Today, our national numbness is wrapped in a Confederate flag. The young man who killed nine members of Charleston's Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church on Wednesday night was an old-school racist.
We Americans usually reserve the more kindly word "patriot" for ourselves and use "nationalist" to diss other people who exhibit special feeling for their country. In the extreme, it's "superpatriot" for us and "ultranationalist" for them.
It will come as no surprise to you that we're top-notch when it comes to denouncing barbarism -- as long as it's theirs. Unfortunately, when it comes to our own barbarism, we turn out to be a tad weaker, whether you're talking about torture or the deaths of children by drone.
The Johnson administration was looking for a pretext to escalate the war. "We don't know what happened," National Security Adviser Walter W. Rostow told the president after Congress passed the resolution, "but it had the desired result."
Our ubiquitous social media are a game changer: having seen pictures of dead boys on a beach, we cannot un-see them.
I lived a childhood of peace. I experienced war as a teenager. And as an adult, I see how the aftermath of violent conflict transforms communities. Unfortunately, the death and suffering of war does not end when the last bullet whizzes by.
Chicago, Chicago! My kind of town, but not this. Young black men in Chicago have to know their legal rights; that's simply the way it works. These guys obviously did.
When I read about bomb blasts and drone strikes in Afghanistan, I can't get these faces out of my mind. So let me introduce you to some of my small friends, whose entire lives have been marked by America's longest and least talked about war.
President Obama and leaders of large orgnaizations are trapped under ever-increasing piles of Big Data, which means they have little knowledge of what's happening on the ground. Using Big Data protocols, metrics and algorithms, they tend to make decisions in isolation of experiential context.