college degrees

I've come to the troubling realization that people have found yet another bias that only serves to divide us. This bias lies in a new form of exclusionary bias or soft bigotry -- education bigotry.
As developing nations industrialize and the United States moves toward an increasingly global economy, education must be the glue that holds American society together as the transition occurs to a post-industrial future.
The best way to understand the stakes in President Obama's proposal to massively expand access to community college is to
This week's White House "College Opportunity" summit will focus on an overlooked area with enormous potential for student success: K-12 and higher education working together to improve college completion. It sounds so simple and obvious. In fact many assume it's already happening.
With the median age of a college student closer to 27 than 19, we need to provide options that enable students to capitalize and benefit from their experience. The advent of Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) is a definite step in the right direction.
One of the faculty who had worked with an elementary school where the teachers visited the homes of each parent shared how they start each meeting with a simple, yet profound question: "What are your hopes and dreams for your child?"
There is no greater financial investment in one's future than a college degree. While this viewpoint has its critics, the reality is the value of a degree has never been greater.
With the cost of a four year college education rapidly moving beyond the range of affordability for many families, this is an excellent time to take a close look as some well-paying occupations that don't require a degree. Fortunately, there are plenty of them.
While more women than men are attending college and earning degrees, pay equity between the genders remains elusive. However, according to new research, the gap in pay equity decreases when looking at the types of degrees individuals hold versus the institutions they attend.
A new study from the Federal Reserve offers more evidence that my humanities-loving child will graduate with lots of debt